Direct Magnitude Estimation and Interval Scaling of Hypernasality Hypernasality is most commonly assessed using equal-appearing interval (EAI) scaling. Recently, the validity of EAI scaling for the evaluation of hypernasality has been questioned. The issue of validity rests on the psychophysical nature of the dimension to be rated. The purpose of this study was to compare EAI scaling with ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2002
Direct Magnitude Estimation and Interval Scaling of Hypernasality
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Tara L. Whitehill, PhD
    University of Hong Kong
  • Alice S. Y. Lee
    University of Hong Kong
  • Joyce C. Chun
    University of Hong Kong
  • Contact author: Tara L. Whitehill, PhD, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Hong Kong, 34 Hospital Road (5/F), Hong Kong. E-mail: tara@hku.hk
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2002
Direct Magnitude Estimation and Interval Scaling of Hypernasality
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2002, Vol. 45, 80-88. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2002/006)
History: Received August 28, 2001 , Accepted November 11, 2001
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2002, Vol. 45, 80-88. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2002/006)
History: Received August 28, 2001; Accepted November 11, 2001
Web of Science® Times Cited: 58

Hypernasality is most commonly assessed using equal-appearing interval (EAI) scaling. Recently, the validity of EAI scaling for the evaluation of hypernasality has been questioned. The issue of validity rests on the psychophysical nature of the dimension to be rated. The purpose of this study was to compare EAI scaling with direct magnitude estimation (DME), in order to determine whether EAI scaling is a valid procedure for the evaluation of hypernasality. Connected speech samples from 20 individuals with repaired cleft palate and hypernasality were used. Twenty listeners undertook the listening tasks, which included EAI scaling, DME with modulus (DME-M), and DME without modulus (DME-WM). The results showed a curvilinear relationship between EAI and DME-M and between EAI and DME-WM, suggesting that EAI may not be a valid method for the evaluation of hypernasality; DME is recommended.

Acknowledgments
Portions of this study were presented at the 9th International Congress on Cleft Palate and Related Craniofacial Abnormalities, Goteberg, Sweden, 25-29 June 2000. This study was supported by a grant from the Hong Kong Research Grants Council (#HKU 7204/99M).
We are grateful to Alexander Francis and Edwin Yiu for helpful comments on an earlier version of this manuscript.
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