Muscle, Adipose, and Connective Tissue Variations in Intrinsic Musculature of the Adult Human Tongue The purpose of this investigation was to identify the composition and organization of lingual tissues underlying the histostructural and biomechanical functions of the adult human tongue. The small-scale structures of three intrinsic muscle regions, their principal cells, structural complexities, and differences in underlying tissue composition were compared to other skeletal ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2002
Muscle, Adipose, and Connective Tissue Variations in Intrinsic Musculature of the Adult Human Tongue
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jeri L. Miller, PhD
    McGill University Montréal, Quebec, Canada
  • Kenneth L. Watkin
    University of Illinois Champaign-Urbana
  • Moy Fong Chen
    Department of Pathology McGill University Montréal, Quebec, Canada
  • Contact author: J. L. Miller, PhD, National Institutes of Health, Warren G. Magnuson Clinical Center, 6S235, Building 10, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD, 20892-1604. E-mail: jmiller@cc.nih.gov
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Special Populations / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Older Adults & Aging / Healthcare Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Regulatory, Legislative & Advocacy / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2002
Muscle, Adipose, and Connective Tissue Variations in Intrinsic Musculature of the Adult Human Tongue
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2002, Vol. 45, 51-65. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2002/004)
History: Received March 6, 2001 , Accepted November 2, 2001
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2002, Vol. 45, 51-65. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2002/004)
History: Received March 6, 2001; Accepted November 2, 2001
Web of Science® Times Cited: 28

The purpose of this investigation was to identify the composition and organization of lingual tissues underlying the histostructural and biomechanical functions of the adult human tongue. The small-scale structures of three intrinsic muscle regions, their principal cells, structural complexities, and differences in underlying tissue composition were compared to other skeletal muscle systems and the results discussed in relation to lingual morphology. Analysis of pixel color distributions determined the percent area concentration of each stained tissue component. Results indicated that muscle content increased from anterior to posterior (p < .0001). Greater adipose (p= .005) and connective tissue (p < .002) concentrations occurred in anterior regions. Dense collagen sheaths and elastic fibers found anteriorly occurred with less magnitude in medial and posterior sites. The unique elastin, collagen, and adipose connective tissue distributions found in intrinsic sampling sites are discussed in terms of understanding lingual biomechanics in both normal and pathologic states.

Acknowledgments
Sections of this work were completed as part of a doctoral dissertation at McGill University, Montréal, Canada. The authors would like to thank members of the Pathology Department at the Royal Victoria Hospital, Montréal, for their assistance in histologic preparation and Barbara C. Sonies, PhD, at the National Institutes of Health for input in the preparation of this manuscript. A portion of this work was supported through funding to the second author from a grant from the National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD.
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