Stability of Behavioral Ratings of Children with SLI Standardized rating scales represent the most reliable method of identifying socioemotional behavioral problems in children with SLI. However, limited information exists on the situational specificity or stability of rating scales applied to this population. In Redmond and Rice (1998), we presented evidence of limited reliability and stability between ratings collected ... Research Note
Research Note  |   February 01, 2002
Stability of Behavioral Ratings of Children with SLI
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sean M. Redmond, PhD
    University of Utah Salt Lake City
  • Mabel L. Rice
    University of Kansas Lawrence
  • Contact author: Sean Redmond, PhD, University of Utah, Department of Communication Disorders, 390 S. 1530 E, BEHS Room 1201, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0252. E-mail: sean.redmond@health.utah.edu
Article Information
Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Language / Research Note
Research Note   |   February 01, 2002
Stability of Behavioral Ratings of Children with SLI
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2002, Vol. 45, 190-201. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2002/014)
History: Received August 27, 2001 , Accepted October 26, 2001
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2002, Vol. 45, 190-201. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2002/014)
History: Received August 27, 2001; Accepted October 26, 2001
Web of Science® Times Cited: 49

Standardized rating scales represent the most reliable method of identifying socioemotional behavioral problems in children with SLI. However, limited information exists on the situational specificity or stability of rating scales applied to this population. In Redmond and Rice (1998), we presented evidence of limited reliability and stability between ratings collected from teachers and parents during kindergarten and first grade. In this research report, we provide additional data on the same group of children over the early elementary period (kindergarten-second grade). The results indicate diminishment in teacher-reported behavior problems in most areas of socioemotional development from kindergarten to second grade and increasing congruence between teacher and parent ratings.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders awards R01 DC01803, awarded to Mabel L. Rice and Kenneth Wexler, and T32 DC00052-02, awarded to Sean M. Redmond.
We express special appreciation to Karla Barnhill and Shannon Wang for their assistance in data collection. Our special appreciation is expressed to the children, parents, and teachers who participated in this study and to the following schools that supported this research. In Edgerton, KS: Edgerton Elementary; in Hutchinson, KS: Allen Elementary, Avenue A Elementary, Morgan Elementary School, Stafford Elementary, South Hutchinson Elementary, Union Valley Elementary; in Lawrence, KS: Centennial Elementary, Deerfield Elementary, Hillcrest Elementary, Hilltop Child Development Center, Kennedy Elementary, New York Elementary, Quail Run Elementary, St. John's Elementary, Sunflower Elementary, Sunset Hills Elementary, Wakarusa Valley Elementary; in Lee's Summit, MO: Meadow Lane Elementary; in Olathe, KS: Scarborough Elementary; in Ottawa, KS: Garfield Elementary, Hawthorne Elementary, Lincoln Elementary; in Overland Park, KS: Holy Trinity Elementary, Nativity Parish; in Wellsville, KS: Wellsville Elementary.
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