Lexical Organization and Phonological Change in Treatment Word frequency and neighborhood density are properties of lexical organization that differentially influence spoken-word recognition. This study examined whether these same properties also affect spoken-word production, particularly as related to children with functional phonological delays. The hypothesis was that differential generalization would be associated with a word's frequency and its ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2002
Lexical Organization and Phonological Change in Treatment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michele L. Morrisette, PhD
    Indiana University Bloomington
  • Judith A. Gierut
    Indiana University Bloomington
  • Contact author: Michele L. Morrisette, PhD, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, 200 South Jordan Avenue, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405-7002. E-mail: mmorrise@indiana.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2002
Lexical Organization and Phonological Change in Treatment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2002, Vol. 45, 143-159. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2002/011)
History: Received March 13, 2001 , Accepted October 26, 2001
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2002, Vol. 45, 143-159. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2002/011)
History: Received March 13, 2001; Accepted October 26, 2001
Web of Science® Times Cited: 33

Word frequency and neighborhood density are properties of lexical organization that differentially influence spoken-word recognition. This study examined whether these same properties also affect spoken-word production, particularly as related to children with functional phonological delays. The hypothesis was that differential generalization would be associated with a word's frequency and its neighborhood density when manipulated as input in phonological treatment. Using a multiple baseline across subjects design, 8 children (aged 3;10 to 5;4) were randomly enrolled in 1 of 4 experimental conditions targeting errored sounds in high-frequency, low-frequency, high-density, or low-density words. Dependent measures were generalization of treated sounds and untreated sounds within and across manner classes as measured during and following treatment. Results supported a hierarchy of phonological generalization by experimental condition. The clinical implications lie in planning for generalization through the input presented in treatment. Theoretically, the results demonstrate that lexical organization of words in the mental lexicon interacts with phonological structure in learning.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported in part by a grant from the National Institutes of Health DC01694 to Indiana University, Bloomington. This experiment was conducted as part of the first author's doctoral dissertation completed at Indiana University. Members of the dissertation committee were Daniel Dinnsen, Karen Forrest, Larry Humes, David Pisoni, and Judith Gierut (chair). I would like to thank them for providing helpful comments and discussion throughout the process. I am especially grateful to David Pisoni and Luis Hernandez for providing access to, and assistance with, the adult dictionary database. Toby Calandra, Annette Hust Champion, and Laura McGarrity assisted with transcription reliability.
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