Evaluation of a Stuttering Treatment Based on Reduction of Short Phonation Intervals This paper reports the results of an efficacy study of a stuttering treatment program known as Modifying Phonation Intervals (MPI), which trains stuttering speakers to reduce the frequency of relatively short phonation intervals (PIs) during connected speech across speaking tasks and situations. Five young adult male stuttering speakers were treated ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 2001
Evaluation of a Stuttering Treatment Based on Reduction of Short Phonation Intervals
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Roger J. Ingham
    University of California Santa Barbara
  • Martin Kilgo
    University of California Santa Barbara
  • Janis C. Ingham
    University of California Santa Barbara
  • Richard Moglia
    University of California Santa Barbara
  • Heather Belknap
    University of California Santa Barbara
  • Tracy Sanchez
    University of California Santa Barbara
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: rjingham@speech.ucsb.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 2001
Evaluation of a Stuttering Treatment Based on Reduction of Short Phonation Intervals
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2001, Vol. 44, 1229-1244. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/096)
History: Received December 5, 2000 , Accepted June 26, 2001
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2001, Vol. 44, 1229-1244. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/096)
History: Received December 5, 2000; Accepted June 26, 2001
Web of Science® Times Cited: 57

This paper reports the results of an efficacy study of a stuttering treatment program known as Modifying Phonation Intervals (MPI), which trains stuttering speakers to reduce the frequency of relatively short phonation intervals (PIs) during connected speech across speaking tasks and situations. Five young adult male stuttering speakers were treated in this computer-based program that systematically trains speakers to reduce selected short PIs found to functionally control stuttering. The treatment process was evaluated using multiple-baseline designs. Treatment was largely self-managed and based on a performance-contingent schedule of within-clinic speaking tasks (Establishment), beyond-clinic speaking tasks (Transfer), and systematic decreases in assessment occasions (Maintenance). Assessments were made at regular intervals before, during, and after treatment. All speakers achieved stutter-free and natural-sounding speech during within- and beyond-clinic speaking tasks at the completion of Mainte-nance. All were tested 12 months after completion of Maintenance, and all maintained the results. The findings from this study suggest that this procedure may make a significant contribution to stuttering treatment practice.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access