Effects of CIC Hearing Aids on Auditory Localization by Listeners With Normal Hearing An experiment was conducted to determine the effects of completely-in-the-canal (CIC) hearing aids on auditory localization performance. Six normal-hearing listeners localized a 750-ms broadband noise from loudspeakers ranging in azimuth from –180° to +180° and in elevation from –75° to +90°. Independent variables included the presence or absence of the ... Research Note
Research Note  |   December 01, 2001
Effects of CIC Hearing Aids on Auditory Localization by Listeners With Normal Hearing
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • William R. D'Angelo
    Air Force Research Laboratory Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH
  • Robert S. Bolia
    Air Force Research Laboratory Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH
  • Pamela J. Mishler
    Dayton Veterans Affairs Medical Center Dayton, OH
  • Linda J. Morris
    Air Force Research Laboratory Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Hearing / Research Note
Research Note   |   December 01, 2001
Effects of CIC Hearing Aids on Auditory Localization by Listeners With Normal Hearing
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2001, Vol. 44, 1209-1214. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/094)
History: Received October 23, 2000 , Accepted August 31, 2001
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2001, Vol. 44, 1209-1214. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/094)
History: Received October 23, 2000; Accepted August 31, 2001
Web of Science® Times Cited: 7

An experiment was conducted to determine the effects of completely-in-the-canal (CIC) hearing aids on auditory localization performance. Six normal-hearing listeners localized a 750-ms broadband noise from loudspeakers ranging in azimuth from –180° to +180° and in elevation from –75° to +90°. Independent variables included the presence or absence of the hearing aid and the elevation of the source. Dependent measures included azimuth error, elevation error, and the percentage of trials resulting in a front-back confusion. The findings indicate a statistically significant decrement in localization acuity, both in azimuth and elevation, occasioned by the wearing of CIC hearing aids. However, the magni-tude of this decrement was small compared to those typically caused by other ear-canal occlusions, such as earplugs, and would probably not engender mislocalization of real-world sounds.

Acknowledgments
The authors would like to acknowledge Angela McCavitt, formerly of theAir Force Research Laboratory; Barry Hill and Laura Reed, of the United StatesAir Force; and Dennis Allen, of Sytronics, Inc., for their technical contributions to this effort. They also thank Starkey Laboratories, Inc., for providing the hearing aids used in this investigation.
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