Specific Language Impairment in Children Is Not Due to a Short-Term Memory Deficit: Response to Gathercole & Baddeley Specific language impairment (SLI) in children is a heterogeneous disorder, which is now well recognized (Aram, Morris, & Hall, 1993; Bishop, 1992). It is as yet unclear to what extent the underlying nature and cause of SLI in children with different characteristics are related. However, relatively homogeneous subgroups of ... Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   April 01, 1995
Specific Language Impairment in Children Is Not Due to a Short-Term Memory Deficit: Response to Gathercole & Baddeley
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • David Howard
    Psychology Department Birkbeck College University of London
  • Heather K. J. van der Lely
    Psychology Department Birkbeck College University of London
Article Information
Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Language / Letters to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   April 01, 1995
Specific Language Impairment in Children Is Not Due to a Short-Term Memory Deficit: Response to Gathercole & Baddeley
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1995, Vol. 38, 466-472. doi:10.1044/jshr.3802.466
History: Received December 12, 1994 , Accepted January 30, 1995
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1995, Vol. 38, 466-472. doi:10.1044/jshr.3802.466
History: Received December 12, 1994; Accepted January 30, 1995
Specific language impairment (SLI) in children is a heterogeneous disorder, which is now well recognized (Aram, Morris, & Hall, 1993; Bishop, 1992). It is as yet unclear to what extent the underlying nature and cause of SLI in children with different characteristics are related. However, relatively homogeneous subgroups of children with SLI may be identified (e.g., Bishop & Adams, 1989; Clahsen, 1991; Gopnik & Crago, 1991; van der Lely, 1994; van der Lely & Stollwerck, in press). The group of children with SLI we were interested in were those characterized by a disproportionate impairment in grammar (e.g., syntax and aspects of morphology) in relation to lexical knowledge (see van der Lely, 1990, 1994; van der Lely & Harris, 1990; van der Lely & Howard, 1993).
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