Short-Term Memory May Yet Be Deficient in Children With Language Impairments: A Comment on van der Lely & Howard (1993) There are some serious flaws in the argument presented by van der Lely and Howard (1993)  that children with specific language impairments do not have deficits in verbal short-term memory, despite earlier evidence that they do (Gathercole & Baddeley, 1990). Here, we take the opportunity to point out that ... Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   April 01, 1995
Short-Term Memory May Yet Be Deficient in Children With Language Impairments: A Comment on van der Lely & Howard (1993)
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Susan E. Gathercole
    Department of Psychology University of Bristol Bristol BS8 1TN
  • Alan D. Baddeley
    MRC Applied Psychology Unit Cambridge University Cambridge, UK
Article Information
Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Language / Letters to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   April 01, 1995
Short-Term Memory May Yet Be Deficient in Children With Language Impairments: A Comment on van der Lely & Howard (1993)
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1995, Vol. 38, 463-466. doi:10.1044/jshr.3802.463
History: Received March 23, 1994 , Accepted September 7, 1994
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1995, Vol. 38, 463-466. doi:10.1044/jshr.3802.463
History: Received March 23, 1994; Accepted September 7, 1994
There are some serious flaws in the argument presented by van der Lely and Howard (1993)  that children with specific language impairments do not have deficits in verbal short-term memory, despite earlier evidence that they do (Gathercole & Baddeley, 1990). Here, we take the opportunity to point out that (a) the experimental methodology employed by van der Lely and Howard fails to provide an interpretable assessment of verbal short-term memory function in their sample with language impairments; (b) by failing to use the conventional memory techniques employed in previous studies, these authors missed the critical opportunity of attempting to replicate the original findings, leaving the disparity between studies necessarily and unsatisfactorily ambiguous; and (c) the criticisms of the criteria used to select the children participating in the Gathercole and Baddeley (1990)  study are ungrounded.
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