Measurement of Narrative Discourse Ability in Children With Language Disorders Narratives from three studies differing in subject pools, elicitation procedures, and story content were analyzed using seven variables hypothesized to measure a variety of language abilities used in narrative production. Two questions were addressed: (a) To what extent did multiple variables represent common factors? and (b) To what extent did ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1995
Measurement of Narrative Discourse Ability in Children With Language Disorders
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Betty Z. Liles
    University of Connecticut Storrs
  • Robert J. Duffy
    University of Connecticut Storrs
  • Donna D. Merritt
    University of Connecticut Storrs
  • Sherry L. Purcell
    University of Connecticut Storrs
  • Contact author: Betty Z. Liles, PhD, Department of Communication Sciences, 850 Bolton Road, U-85, University of Connecticut Storrs, CT 06268
    Contact author: Betty Z. Liles, PhD, Department of Communication Sciences, 850 Bolton Road, U-85, University of Connecticut Storrs, CT 06268×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1995
Measurement of Narrative Discourse Ability in Children With Language Disorders
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1995, Vol. 38, 415-425. doi:10.1044/jshr.3802.415
History: Received March 18, 1994 , Accepted September 20, 1994
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1995, Vol. 38, 415-425. doi:10.1044/jshr.3802.415
History: Received March 18, 1994; Accepted September 20, 1994

Narratives from three studies differing in subject pools, elicitation procedures, and story content were analyzed using seven variables hypothesized to measure a variety of language abilities used in narrative production. Two questions were addressed: (a) To what extent did multiple variables represent common factors? and (b) To what extent did these variables distinguish children with language disorder from their nondisordered peers? Results indicated that: (a) The seven variables represented two factors; Factor I measured global organization of content (i.e., episode structure), and Factor II measured within- and across-sentence structure (i.e., grammatical sentence structure, within subordinate clause productivity, and textual cohesion), and (b) regardless of study, only the variables representing Factor II were selected as the most effective in predicting group membership.

Acknowledgments
The authors greatly appreciate the assistance of Deanne Elia who participated in the extensive analysis of the 114 narratives and to Steven Owen, professor of educational psychology, who consulted with the authors regarding the statistical analyses. In addition, the authors acknowledge the University of Connecticut Research Foundation’s financial support of this project.
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