Phonological Working Memory and Speech Production in Preschool Children This study investigates whether phonological working memory is associated with spoken language development in preschool children. Assessments were made of speech corpora taken from 3-year old children grouped in terms of their phonological memory abilities. Both quantitative and qualitative indices of the children’s spontaneous speech output were taken in a ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1995
Phonological Working Memory and Speech Production in Preschool Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Anne-Marie Adams
    Department of Psychology University of Liverpool Liverpool, England
  • Susan E. Gathercole
    Department of Psychology University of Bristol Bristol, England
  • Contact author: Anne-Marie Adams, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M139PL, England.
    Contact author: Anne-Marie Adams, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M139PL, England.×
Article Information
Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1995
Phonological Working Memory and Speech Production in Preschool Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1995, Vol. 38, 403-414. doi:10.1044/jshr.3802.403
History: Received November 15, 1993 , Accepted August 24, 1994
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1995, Vol. 38, 403-414. doi:10.1044/jshr.3802.403
History: Received November 15, 1993; Accepted August 24, 1994

This study investigates whether phonological working memory is associated with spoken language development in preschool children. Assessments were made of speech corpora taken from 3-year old children grouped in terms of their phonological memory abilities. Both quantitative and qualitative indices of the children’s spontaneous speech output were taken in a structured play session. Significant differences were found, with children of good phonological memory abilities producing language that was more grammatically complex, contained a richer array of words, and included longer utterances than children of poor phonological memory abilities. The possible mechanisms by which phonological working memory skills are linked to the production of speech are considered.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by a research project award from the Economic and Social Research Council and constitutes part of the doctoral research of the first author. The authors would like to express their gratitude to the parents and the children for their cooperation in this project.
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