Stuttering Includes Both Within-Word and Between-Word Disfluencies A growing practice divides stuttered disfluencies from normal disfluencies by defining the former as “within-word” and the latter as “between-word.” After reviewing the available logical and empirical evidence, this note concludes that the unstated implications of a strong form of this definition (that no between-word disfluencies are stuttering and that ... Research Note
Research Note  |   April 01, 1995
Stuttering Includes Both Within-Word and Between-Word Disfluencies
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Anne K. Cordes
    University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Contact author: Anne K. Cordes, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106–7050.
    Contact author: Anne K. Cordes, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106–7050.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech / Research Notes
Research Note   |   April 01, 1995
Stuttering Includes Both Within-Word and Between-Word Disfluencies
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1995, Vol. 38, 382-386. doi:10.1044/jshr.3802.382
History: Received July 28, 1994 , Accepted October 24, 1994
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1995, Vol. 38, 382-386. doi:10.1044/jshr.3802.382
History: Received July 28, 1994; Accepted October 24, 1994

A growing practice divides stuttered disfluencies from normal disfluencies by defining the former as “within-word” and the latter as “between-word.” After reviewing the available logical and empirical evidence, this note concludes that the unstated implications of a strong form of this definition (that no between-word disfluencies are stuttering and that all within-word disfluencies are stuttering) cannot currently be supported. A weaker form of this definition might prove useful for the definition and measurement of stuttering, but only if such a definition can be both internally consistent and consistent with available clinical and empirical information.

Acknowledgments
Preparation of this manuscript was supported by funds from research grant #DC00060, awarded to R. J. Ingham by the National Institutes of Health.
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