Acoustic Correlates of Inspiratory Phonation During Infant Cry The duration and vocal fundamental frequency (Fo) of inspiratory cries produced by a group of 20 healthy infants were measured. Similar acoustic measures were applied to the cries immediately preceding and following an inspiratory cry as a means of characterizing an inspiratory “event.” Results were that the number of inspiratory ... Research Note
Research Note  |   April 01, 1995
Acoustic Correlates of Inspiratory Phonation During Infant Cry
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Susan M. Grau
    University of Hawaii Honolulu
  • Michael P. Robb
    University of Connecticut Storrs
  • Anthony T. Cacace
    Albany Medical College Albany, NY
  • Contact author: Michael Robb, PhD, Department of Communication Sciences, University of Connecticut, 850 Bolton Road, Box U-85, Storrs, CT 06269, E-mail: mrobb@uconnvm.uconn.edu
Article Information
Development / Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Notes
Research Note   |   April 01, 1995
Acoustic Correlates of Inspiratory Phonation During Infant Cry
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1995, Vol. 38, 373-381. doi:10.1044/jshr.3802.373
History: Received June 13, 1994 , Accepted October 12, 1994
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1995, Vol. 38, 373-381. doi:10.1044/jshr.3802.373
History: Received June 13, 1994; Accepted October 12, 1994

The duration and vocal fundamental frequency (Fo) of inspiratory cries produced by a group of 20 healthy infants were measured. Similar acoustic measures were applied to the cries immediately preceding and following an inspiratory cry as a means of characterizing an inspiratory “event.” Results were that the number of inspiratory cries varied considerably from child to child during a complete crying episode. The duration and Fo of inspiratory cries were significantly shorter and higher, respectively, in comparison to cries immediately preceding and following the inspiratory cry. In addition, the gap duration following an inspiratory cry was significantly greater than the pre-inspiratory gap duration. Discussion centers on the anatomical and physiological bases of inspiratory cry phonation. Implications as well as the need to consider the inspiratory portion of crying behavior when examining infants at risk for respiratory distress also are discussed.

Acknowledgments
This research was completed as partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science completed by the first author, under the direction of the second author. The authors wish to thank David Crowell for his comments on previous versions of this paper. Marsha McGlynn provided helpful assistance in collecting cry samples from the group of infants. We appreciate the support provided by staff at the Children’s Hospital of Albany Medical Center, particularly Herman Risemberg.
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