Identifying the Onset and Offset of Stuttering Events This study was designed to investigate the apparent contradiction between recent reports of physiological and interpersonal research on stuttering that claim or imply high agreement levels, and studies of stuttering judgment agreement itself that report much lower agreement levels. Four experienced stuttering researchers in one university department used laser videodisks ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1995
Identifying the Onset and Offset of Stuttering Events
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Roger J. Ingham
    University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Anne K. Cordes
    University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Janis Costello Ingham
    University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Merrilyn L. Gow
    Teachers College, Columbia University New York, NY
  • Contact author: Roger J. Ingham, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106.
    Contact author: Roger J. Ingham, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1995
Identifying the Onset and Offset of Stuttering Events
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1995, Vol. 38, 315-326. doi:10.1044/jshr.3802.315
History: Received June 17, 1994 , Accepted October 13, 1994
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1995, Vol. 38, 315-326. doi:10.1044/jshr.3802.315
History: Received June 17, 1994; Accepted October 13, 1994

This study was designed to investigate the apparent contradiction between recent reports of physiological and interpersonal research on stuttering that claim or imply high agreement levels, and studies of stuttering judgment agreement itself that report much lower agreement levels. Four experienced stuttering researchers in one university department used laser videodisks of spontaneous speech, from persons whose stuttering could be described as mild to severe, to locate the precise onset and offset of individual stuttering events. Results showed a series of interjudge disagreements that raise serious questions about the reliability and validity of stuttering event onset and offset judgments. These results highlight the potentially poor reliability of a measurement procedure that is currently widespread in stuttering research. At the same time, they have isolated some few highly agreed stuttering events that might serve as the basis for the further development of either event-based or interval-based judgment procedures.

Acknowledgments
Senior authorship is considered equal between the first two authors. As always, we express our appreciation for invaluable technical and statistical support to Richard Moglia and Peter Frank. Some of the speech samples used for this study were drawn from a pool of samples developed with assistance from Richard Martin, Deborah Kully, Julia Boberg, and Einer Boberg. This research was supported by research grant number DC00060, awarded to R. J. Ingham by the National Institutes of Health.
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