Intelligibility and Phonetic Contrast Errors in Highly Intelligible Speakers With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Intelligibility data, phonetic contrast errors, and information regarding subsystem involvement were examined in 29 highly intelligible subjects (18 women and 11 men) with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Results are discussed in terms of data for individual subjects, the group as a whole, and for subgroups based on dysarthric status and gender. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1995
Intelligibility and Phonetic Contrast Errors in Highly Intelligible Speakers With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joanne Riddel
    Department of Communication Sciences University of Vermont Burlington
  • Rebecca J. McCauley
    Department of Communication Sciences University of Vermont Burlington
  • Moira Mulligan
    Center for Disorders of Communication Medical Center Hospital of Vermont Burlington
  • Rup Tandan
    Department of Neurology University of Vermont Burlington
  • Contact author: Rebecca J. McCauley, Department of Communication Sciences, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405.
    Contact author: Rebecca J. McCauley, Department of Communication Sciences, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Dysarthria / Special Populations / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1995
Intelligibility and Phonetic Contrast Errors in Highly Intelligible Speakers With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1995, Vol. 38, 304-314. doi:10.1044/jshr.3802.304
History: Received April 25, 1994 , Accepted October 6, 1994
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1995, Vol. 38, 304-314. doi:10.1044/jshr.3802.304
History: Received April 25, 1994; Accepted October 6, 1994

Intelligibility data, phonetic contrast errors, and information regarding subsystem involvement were examined in 29 highly intelligible subjects (18 women and 11 men) with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Results are discussed in terms of data for individual subjects, the group as a whole, and for subgroups based on dysarthric status and gender. Of particular interest are findings that suggest early laryngeal involvement as well as gender-related differences for several contrasts.

Acknowledgments
The authors thank Lakshmi Boyle, Andrea Elkins, Maureen Kenny Delaney, and Judy Haynos for their technical assistance, and Alan Howard for his statistical guidance. In addition, we would like to thank three anonymous reviewers and Lorraine Olson Ramig for their constructive comments. This research was supported in part by the Muscular Dystrophy Association, Food and Drug Administration (FD-U-000512–03–1), General Clinical Research Center, Division of the National Institutes of Health (GCRC #452), and Tyson and Associates, Inc., Hawthorne, CA.
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