Acoustic Prediction of Severity in Commonly Occurring Voice Problems The relative effectiveness of three acoustic measures (jitter, shimmer, and harmonic/noise ratio) in predicting the dysphonic severity of a diverse clinical population singly and together was investigated. Phonatory samples were recorded from 20 normal subjects and 60 patients representing 3 laryngeal groups (nodules, paralysis, and functional). The phonatory samples were ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1995
Acoustic Prediction of Severity in Commonly Occurring Voice Problems
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Virginia Wolfe
    Auburn University at Montgomery Montgomery, AL
  • James Fitch
    Auburn University Auburn, AL
  • Richard Cornell
    Auburn University at Montgomery Montgomery, AL
  • Contact author: Virginia Wolfe, PhD, Speech and Hearing Clinic, 7300 University Drive, Auburn University at Montgomery, Montgomery, AL 36117–3596.
    Contact author: Virginia Wolfe, PhD, Speech and Hearing Clinic, 7300 University Drive, Auburn University at Montgomery, Montgomery, AL 36117–3596.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1995
Acoustic Prediction of Severity in Commonly Occurring Voice Problems
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1995, Vol. 38, 273-279. doi:10.1044/jshr.3802.273
History: Received December 6, 1993 , Accepted August 30, 1994
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1995, Vol. 38, 273-279. doi:10.1044/jshr.3802.273
History: Received December 6, 1993; Accepted August 30, 1994

The relative effectiveness of three acoustic measures (jitter, shimmer, and harmonic/noise ratio) in predicting the dysphonic severity of a diverse clinical population singly and together was investigated. Phonatory samples were recorded from 20 normal subjects and 60 patients representing 3 laryngeal groups (nodules, paralysis, and functional). The phonatory samples were evaluated by 22 listeners using a 7-point equal-appearing interval scale. Shimmer produced a bivariate correlation of 0.54 with dysphonic severity; harmonic/noise ratio correlated −0.32 with dysphonic severity; and jitter produced no significant correlation with severity. The combination of acoustic variables through multiple regression analysis produced a correlation of 0.56, with only shimmer and average F0 contributing to the correlation. For this particular clinical population, therefore, findings indicated that (a) none of the variables was strongly correlated with dysphonia ratings, and (b) a combination of acoustic predictors was no more successful than a single predictor of dysphonic severity, namely, shimmer.

Acknowledgments
The assistance of David Wolensak in the statistical analysis is gratefully acknowledged. The comments of David Martin are also greatly appreciated.
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