The Impact of Emphatic Stress on Novel Word Learning by Children With Specific Language Impairment This investigation examined the influence of emphatic stress on children's novel word learning. Forty school-age children participated in this study, including 20 children with specific language impairment (SLI) and 20 children with normal language (NL) development. Results indicated that there were no significant stress effects for comprehension or recognition of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1998
The Impact of Emphatic Stress on Novel Word Learning by Children With Specific Language Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Susan Ellis Weismer
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Linda J. Hesketh
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Contact author: Susan Ellis Weismer, University of Wiscon-sin-Madison, Waisman Center and Dept. of Communicative Disorders, 1500 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI 53705 Email: sweismer@facstaff.wisc.edu
Article Information
Development / Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1998
The Impact of Emphatic Stress on Novel Word Learning by Children With Specific Language Impairment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1998, Vol. 41, 1444-1458. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4106.1444
History: Received October 21, 1997 , Accepted April 25, 1998
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1998, Vol. 41, 1444-1458. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4106.1444
History: Received October 21, 1997; Accepted April 25, 1998

This investigation examined the influence of emphatic stress on children's novel word learning. Forty school-age children participated in this study, including 20 children with specific language impairment (SLI) and 20 children with normal language (NL) development. Results indicated that there were no significant stress effects for comprehension or recognition of novel words (for which all children demonstrated relatively high levels of performance); however, children in both groups exhibited significantly better production of words that had been presented with emphatic stress than with neutral stress. These findings are discussed within a limited capacity framework of language processing.

Acknowledgments
This research was funded by a grant from National Institutes of Health, NIDCD (1R29DC011) awarded to the first author. We would like to thank Chris Hollar, Cheryl Neylon, and Elin T. Thordardottir for their assistance with this study. We appreciate the helpful comments of Chris Dollaghan, Jan Edwards, and an anonymous reviewer on an earlier draft of this manuscript. We are extremely grateful to the Madison Metropolitan School District for their help in identifying participants and to the children and their parents for participating in this project.
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