Early Verb-Related Vulnerability Among Children With Specific Language Impairment The purpose of this study was to characterize the nature of early grammatical development among very young children with specific language impairment (SLI). Grammatical development was examined for two subtypes: (a) children with expressive language impairments only (SLI-E) and (b) children with both receptive and expressive language impairments (SLI-RE). In ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1998
Early Verb-Related Vulnerability Among Children With Specific Language Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Pamela A. Hadley
    Arizona State University Tempe
  • Contact author: Pamela A. Hadley, PhD, Department of Speech and Hearing Science, P.O. Box 871908, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-1908. Email: hadley@asu.edu
Article Information
Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1998
Early Verb-Related Vulnerability Among Children With Specific Language Impairment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1998, Vol. 41, 1384-1397. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4106.1384
History: Received July 2, 1997 , Accepted April 13, 1998
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1998, Vol. 41, 1384-1397. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4106.1384
History: Received July 2, 1997; Accepted April 13, 1998

The purpose of this study was to characterize the nature of early grammatical development among very young children with specific language impairment (SLI). Grammatical development was examined for two subtypes: (a) children with expressive language impairments only (SLI-E) and (b) children with both receptive and expressive language impairments (SLI-RE). In particular, characteristics of noun-phrase (NP) and verb-phrase (VP) elaboration were examined longitudinally to determine whether structures associated with NP and VP emerged together following a typical developmental progression. Group analyses did not reveal any differences between the subtypes on the Index of Productive Syntax (IPSyn; Scarborough, 1990). However, specific weakness in VP elaboration was revealed on the IPSyn as well as in more extensive productivity analyses. The contribution of these findings to a developmentally sensitive grammatical description of SLI for very young children is discussed.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by an American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation New Investigator Award and a Faculty-in-Aid Grant Program from Arizona State University to the author. Portions of this paper were presented at the 1995 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association convention in Orlando, FL and at the 1997 Arizona Speech-Language-Hearing Association convention in Phoenix, AZ. Many graduate students must also be recognized for their invaluable assistance during different phases of this project: Liz Arenas, Valerie Duncan, Josefa Hernandez, Windi Krok, Amy Reeves, and Mari Suzuki. I also thank Matthew Rispoli, Janna Oetting, Melanie Schuele, and David Ingram for their constructive criticism on earlier drafts of this paper as well as Cheryl Scott and two anonymous reviewers for their critical feedback during the review process. Finally, special appreciation is extended to Jeanne Wilcox for access to the archival database, which was originally collected with the support of a U.S. Department of Education Research Grant #H024G80012 awarded to Professor Wilcox. The information contained in this article does not necessarily reflect the view of the Department of Education, and no official endorsement should be inferred.
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