Analysis of Observational Data in Speech and Language Research Using Generalizability Theory Most research in speech-language pathology relies on observational data collected by human observers or judges. The reliability and generalizability of such measurements are always important considerations. This article reviews classical methods of estimating reliability and proposes that a more powerful approach capable of estimating the dependability of behavioral measurements is ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1998
Analysis of Observational Data in Speech and Language Research Using Generalizability Theory
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jana M. Scarsellone
    University of Alberta Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
  • Contact author: Jana Scarsellone, PhD, University of Alberta, Rehab Medicine, 3-48 Corbett Hall, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G4, Canada
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1998
Analysis of Observational Data in Speech and Language Research Using Generalizability Theory
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1998, Vol. 41, 1341-1347. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4106.1341
History: Received June 25, 1997 , Accepted February 18, 1998
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1998, Vol. 41, 1341-1347. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4106.1341
History: Received June 25, 1997; Accepted February 18, 1998

Most research in speech-language pathology relies on observational data collected by human observers or judges. The reliability and generalizability of such measurements are always important considerations. This article reviews classical methods of estimating reliability and proposes that a more powerful approach capable of estimating the dependability of behavioral measurements is available. This approach, based on generalizability theory, provides a practical framework for estimating multiple sources of measurement error in the collection of observational data. Concepts central to generalizability theory are discussed, and a hypothetical data set illustrates the usefulness of generalizability measurements in speech and language research.

Acknowledgment
I thank Dr. Sharon Warren, Director, Rehabilitation Research Centre, Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Alberta, for her help in preparing this manuscript.
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