HINT List Equivalency Using Older Listeners HINT list equivalency was examined using 24 listeners between 60 and 70 years old who had sensorineural hearing impairment. A Greco-Latin square design was used to ensure that each list was presented an equal number of times per condition. Four conditions were tested: (1) speech in quiet, (2) speech in ... Research Note
Research Note  |   December 01, 1998
HINT List Equivalency Using Older Listeners
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Wendy D. Hanks
    Brigham Young University Provo, Utah
  • Gabrielle D. Johnson
    Brigham Young University Provo, Utah
  • Contact author: Wendy D. Hanks, PhD, Department of Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology, 138 TLRB, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602–8651.
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing / Research Note
Research Note   |   December 01, 1998
HINT List Equivalency Using Older Listeners
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1998, Vol. 41, 1335-1340. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4106.1335
History: Received January 22, 1998 , Accepted August 5, 1998
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1998, Vol. 41, 1335-1340. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4106.1335
History: Received January 22, 1998; Accepted August 5, 1998

HINT list equivalency was examined using 24 listeners between 60 and 70 years old who had sensorineural hearing impairment. A Greco-Latin square design was used to ensure that each list was presented an equal number of times per condition. Four conditions were tested: (1) speech in quiet, (2) speech in 65 dBA noise with noise at 0° azimuth, (3) speech in 65 dBA noise with noise at 90° azimuth, and (4) speech in 65 dBA noise with noise at 270° azimuth. Speech materials were always presented at 0° azimuth. Overall mean scores ranged from 29.9 dBA for the quiet condition to 63.4 dBA for the noise at 0° azimuth condition. A significant difference was found between Lists 13 and 16 only. This was attributed to audibility differences among the listeners. Therefore, the 25 HINT lists should be considered equivalent for older populations with similar hearing impairment. The HINT lists can be used for relative measures, such as comparison of aided versus unaided sentence SRTs or comparison of 2 different hearing aids.

Acknowledgments
The authors wish to thank Lee Hendrix for his assistance in statistical design and analysis. Appreciation is also expressed to the reviewers and editors for their helpful input to this manuscript. Portions of this paper were presented at the 1998 convention of the American Academy of Audiology, Los Angeles, CA.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access