Adaptation of Stuttering Frequency During Repeated Readings Associated Changes in Acoustic Parameters of Perceptually Fluent Speech Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1998
Adaptation of Stuttering Frequency During Repeated Readings
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ludo Max
    Kent State University Ohio
  • Anthony J. Caruso
    Kent State University Ohio
  • Contact author: Ludo Max, Department of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, School of Graduate Medical Education, Seton Hall University, 400 South Orange Avenue, South Orange, NJ 07079-2685. Email: maxludo@shu.edu
  • Currently affiliated with Seton Hall University
    Currently affiliated with Seton Hall University×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1998
Adaptation of Stuttering Frequency During Repeated Readings
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1998, Vol. 41, 1265-1281. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4106.1265
History: Received March 9, 1998 , Accepted July 30, 1998
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1998, Vol. 41, 1265-1281. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4106.1265
History: Received March 9, 1998; Accepted July 30, 1998

This study is part of a series investigating the hypothesis that stuttering adaptation is a result of motor learning. Previous investigations indicate that nonspeech motor learning typically is associated with an increase in speed of performance. Previous investigations of stuttering, on the other hand, indicate that improvements in fluency during most fluency-enhancing conditions or after stuttering treatment tend to be associated with decreased speech rate, increased duration of specific acoustic segments, and decreased vowel duration variability. The present acoustic findings, obtained from 8 individuals who stutter, reveal that speech adjustments occurring during adaptation differ from those reported for other fluency-enhancing conditions or stuttering treatment. Instead, the observed changes are consistent with those occurring during skill improvements for nonspeech motor tasks and, thus, with a motor learning hypothesis of stuttering adaptation. During the last of 6 repeated readings, a statistically significant increase in articulation rate was observed, together with a decrease in word duration, vowel duration, and consonant-vowel (CV) transition extent. Other adjustments showing relatively consistent trends across individual subjects included decreased CV transition rate and duration, and increased variability of both CV transition extent and vowel duration.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported in part by a grant from the Stichting Logopedie Fonds (Belgium). The authors gratefully acknowledge Anja Vandevenne and Julie A. Kobak for their respective contributions to this research.
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