Two- to Six-Year Controlled-Trial Stuttering Outcomes for Children and Adolescents This research is a long-term follow-up of a previously published, controlled trial on the effectiveness of 3 stuttering treatments (intensive smooth speech, parenthome smooth speech, and intensive electromyography feedback) for children and adolescents, aged 11 to 18 years, who stutter. The previous controlled trial showed all 3 treatments to be ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1998
Two- to Six-Year Controlled-Trial Stuttering Outcomes for Children and Adolescents
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Karen Hancock
    University of Technology, Sydney Australia
  • Ashley Craig
    University of Technology, Sydney Australia
  • Chris McCready
    University of Technology, Sydney Australia
  • Annette McCaul
    University of Technology, Sydney Australia
  • Deborah Costello
    University of Technology, Sydney Australia
  • Karen Campbell
    University of Technology, Sydney Australia
  • Gillian Gilmore
    University of Technology, Sydney Australia
  • Contact author: Ashley Craig, PhD, Department of Health Science, University of Technology, Sydney, P.O. Box 123, Broadway, 2007, NSW, Australia.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1998
Two- to Six-Year Controlled-Trial Stuttering Outcomes for Children and Adolescents
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1998, Vol. 41, 1242-1252. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4106.1242
History: Received September 29, 1997 , Accepted June 15, 1998
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1998, Vol. 41, 1242-1252. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4106.1242
History: Received September 29, 1997; Accepted June 15, 1998

This research is a long-term follow-up of a previously published, controlled trial on the effectiveness of 3 stuttering treatments (intensive smooth speech, parenthome smooth speech, and intensive electromyography feedback) for children and adolescents, aged 11 to 18 years, who stutter. The previous controlled trial showed all 3 treatments to be effective compared to nontreatment after 12 months. This paper reports on the treatment effectiveness after an average of 4 years post-treatment. Results demonstrate that treatment gains were maintained in the long term, with rates of stuttering similar to the 1-year postoutcomes. There were no significant differences among the 3 treatments in long-term effectiveness. This controlled study substantiates the claim that the treatments investigated will more than likely have substantial long-term benefits for the fluency and personality of children and adolescents who stutter.

Acknowledgments
This research was funded by the University of Technology, Sydney, and a Commonwealth Department of Health Grant (RADGAC). Thanks also to the following funding bodies who also contributed financially to the research: the BBM, the Australian Rotary Health Research Fund, the Sunshine Foundation, and the Inger Rice Foundation.
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