A Tutorial on Conducting Meta-Analyses of Clinical Outcome Research Throughout the educational, medical, psychological, and social sciences, meta-analysis is the present-day, broadly accepted means for combining many quasiexperiments in a synthesis for the purpose of establishing the weight of scientific evidence bearing on a certain research question. Meta-analysis thereby is the preferred method for determining the preponderance of evidence ... Tutorial
Tutorial  |   December 01, 1998
A Tutorial on Conducting Meta-Analyses of Clinical Outcome Research
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Randall R. Robey
    University of Virginia Charlottesville
  • Susan D. Dalebout
    University of Virginia Charlottesville
  • Contact author: Randall R. Robey, PhD, Communication Disorders Program, University of Virginia, Suite 202, 2205 Fontaine Ave., Charlottesville, VA 22903. Email: rrr7w@virginia.edu
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Hearing / Tutorial
Tutorial   |   December 01, 1998
A Tutorial on Conducting Meta-Analyses of Clinical Outcome Research
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1998, Vol. 41, 1227-1241. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4106.1227
History: Received March 10, 1998 , Accepted August 11, 1998
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1998, Vol. 41, 1227-1241. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4106.1227
History: Received March 10, 1998; Accepted August 11, 1998

Throughout the educational, medical, psychological, and social sciences, meta-analysis is the present-day, broadly accepted means for combining many quasiexperiments in a synthesis for the purpose of establishing the weight of scientific evidence bearing on a certain research question. Meta-analysis thereby is the preferred method for determining the preponderance of evidence in clinical-outcome research relating to questions of treatment efficacy and treatment effectiveness. Relatively few meta-analyses appear in the literature of the communication disorder sciences. The purpose of this tutorial is to enhance the familiarity and accessibility of this technology in the domains of audiology and speech-language pathology. The results of the accompanying example constitute a preliminary meta-analysis of patient-perceived treatment effectiveness. The substance of the tutorial, however, transcends disciplinary interests regarding types of communication disorder.

Acknowledgments
The authors thank Dr. Robert T. Wertz for the insight leading to this cross-disciplinary work and Drs. Richard F. Curlee and Martin C. Schultz for helpful comments regarding early drafts of the manuscript.
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