Summary Publication Statistics for 1997 Beginning this year the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research will publish annual summary statistics of manuscript processing times and acceptance/rejection rates in the December issue. The summary statistics pertain to manuscripts submitted during the previous calendar year, because these manuscripts are likely to have completed the editorial process. ... Editorial
Editorial  |   December 01, 1998
Summary Publication Statistics for 1997
 
Author Notes
  • Sandra Gordon-SalantCoordinating Editor
Article Information
Editorial
Editorial   |   December 01, 1998
Summary Publication Statistics for 1997
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1998, Vol. 41, 1225-1226. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4106.1225
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1998, Vol. 41, 1225-1226. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4106.1225
Beginning this year the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research will publish annual summary statistics of manuscript processing times and acceptance/rejection rates in the December issue. The summary statistics pertain to manuscripts submitted during the previous calendar year, because these manuscripts are likely to have completed the editorial process. The decision to publish the summary statistics was made by the Publications Board. Separate summary statistics are given for each of the three (speech, language, and hearing) sections of JSLHR. The Coordinating Editor of the journal is responsible for preparing these statistics for publication.
The summary statistics are intended to provide useful data to the readers of JSLHR, authors considering submitting a new manuscript, and authors of manuscripts published in JSLHR. For example, readers of the journal may be interested in knowing the timeliness of published articles, as indicated by the sum of the submission to final decision to accept intervals (Table 2) and the accept-to-publication intervals in Table 3 (see below). Authors considering the submission of a new manuscript may want to know the average time lag from submission to final decision so they can anticipate how long review of their own manuscripts is likely to take. Authors of published articles may require acceptance/ rejection rate information for promotion decisions. Frequently, decisions about promotion of a professional are made, in part, on the basis of the quality of the journals in which that professional has published articles. Judgments concerning journal quality are formulated in many academic institutions by the acceptance and rejection rates of the journal. High acceptance rates are often perceived as reflecting a very lax editorial policy, whereas low acceptance rates are perceived as demonstrating high standards of scientific review and acceptance. ASHA, the Publications Board, and the Editors of JSLHR do not endorse this practice, primarily because it assumes that the quality of manuscripts submitted to different journals is the same. It also assumes that different journals calculate their acceptance/rejection rate statistics in the same manner. Neither of these assumptions may be correct; thus, the practice may not be valid. Our solution is to present relevant data together with a clear description of what they represent.
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