Effects of Divided Attention on the Production of Filled Pauses and Repetitions The purpose of the present study was to examine effects of divided attention on the production of filled pauses and repetitions. Attention was divided by means of a dual-task paradigm. Eighteen nonstuttering adult subjects performed a picture story-telling task, with and without simultaneously performing a tactileform recognition task. Results indicate ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 2001
Effects of Divided Attention on the Production of Filled Pauses and Repetitions
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Claudy C. E. Oomen
    Psychological Laboratory Utrecht University Utrecht, The Netherlands
  • Albert Postma
    Psychological Laboratory Utrecht University Utrecht, The Netherlands
  • Contact author: Claudy C. E. Oomen, PhD, Psychological Laboratory, Utrecht University, Heidelberglaan 2, 3584 CS Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Contact author: Claudy C. E. Oomen, PhD, Psychological Laboratory, Utrecht University, Heidelberglaan 2, 3584 CS Utrecht, The Netherlands.×
  • Corresponding author: E-mail: c.oomen@fss.uu.nl
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 2001
Effects of Divided Attention on the Production of Filled Pauses and Repetitions
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2001, Vol. 44, 997-1004. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/078)
History: Received September 9, 2000 , Accepted April 25, 2001
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2001, Vol. 44, 997-1004. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/078)
History: Received September 9, 2000; Accepted April 25, 2001
Web of Science® Times Cited: 15

The purpose of the present study was to examine effects of divided attention on the production of filled pauses and repetitions. Attention was divided by means of a dual-task paradigm. Eighteen nonstuttering adult subjects performed a picture story-telling task, with and without simultaneously performing a tactileform recognition task. Results indicate that the number of filled pauses and repetitions increased in a situation of divided attention. This suggests that the production of filled pauses and repetitions, which are considered to be reactions to problems in speech planning, is governed by processes that operate relatively independently of the available attentional resources. It was speculated that these disfluencies could be automatic reactions to the increased planning difficulties induced by the concurrent task.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by a grant from the Dutch Organization for Scientific Research (NWO, grant 575-21- 003). The second author was supported by NWO grant 440- 20-000.
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