Perceptual Weighting of Relative Amplitude and Formant Transition Cues in Aided CV Syllables The current study explored the changes in weighting of relative amplitude and formant transition cues that may be caused by a K-amp circuit. Twelve listeners with normal hearing and 3 listeners with sensorineural hearing loss labeled the stop consonant place of articulation of synthetic consonant-vowel stimuli. Within the stimuli, two ... Research Note
Research Note  |   October 01, 2001
Perceptual Weighting of Relative Amplitude and Formant Transition Cues in Aided CV Syllables
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mark Hedrick
    The University of Tennessee Knoxville
  • Mary Sue Younger
    The University of Tennessee Knoxville
  • Contact author: Mark S. Hedrick, PhD, Department of Audiology & Speech Pathology, The University of Tennessee, 457 South Stadium Hall, Knoxville, TN 37996-0740.
    Contact author: Mark S. Hedrick, PhD, Department of Audiology & Speech Pathology, The University of Tennessee, 457 South Stadium Hall, Knoxville, TN 37996-0740.×
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: mhedric1@utk.edu
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing / Research Note
Research Note   |   October 01, 2001
Perceptual Weighting of Relative Amplitude and Formant Transition Cues in Aided CV Syllables
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2001, Vol. 44, 964-974. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/075)
History: Received February 5, 2001 , Accepted April 13, 2001
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2001, Vol. 44, 964-974. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/075)
History: Received February 5, 2001; Accepted April 13, 2001
Web of Science® Times Cited: 10

The current study explored the changes in weighting of relative amplitude and formant transition cues that may be caused by a K-amp circuit. Twelve listeners with normal hearing and 3 listeners with sensorineural hearing loss labeled the stop consonant place of articulation of synthetic consonant-vowel stimuli. Within the stimuli, two acoustic cues were varied: the frequency of the onset of the second and third formant (F2/F3) transitions and the relative amplitude between the consonant burst and the following vowel in the fourth and fifth formant (F4/ F5) frequency region. The variation in the two cues ranged from values appropriate for a voiceless labial stop consonant to a voiceless alveolar stop consonant. The listeners labeled both the unaided stimuli and the stimuli recorded through a hearing aid with a K-amp circuit. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) model was used to calculate the perceptual weight given each cue. Data from listeners with normal hearing show a change in relative weighting of cues between aided and unaided stimuli. Pilot data from the listeners with hearing loss show a more varied pattern, with more weight placed on relative amplitude. These results suggest that calculation of perceptual weights using an ANOVA model may be worthwhile in future studies examining the relationship between acoustic information presented by a hearing aid and the subsequent perception by the listener with hearing loss.

Acknowledgments
Support for this project was provided by a Professional Development Award from The University of Tennessee, Knoxville and in part by a grant form the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health (1 R55 DC03682). We thank Unitron for the generous loan of the hearing aid used in this study and Jan Dungan, Linda Reed, and Jack Ferrell for their help. In addition, we thank Drs. Steve Handel, Larry Humes, Laurel Christenson, and two anonymous reviewers for their contributions to the manuscript.
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