Phonological Similarity Effects in Memory for Serial Order of Cued Speech Experiment I investigated memory for serial order by congenitally, profoundly deaf individuals, 6–22 years old, for words presented via Cued Speech (CS) without sound. CS is a system that resolves the ambiguity inherent in speechreading through the addition of manual cues. The phonological components of CS are mouth shape, hand ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 2001
Phonological Similarity Effects in Memory for Serial Order of Cued Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jacqueline Leybaert
    Université Libre de Bruxelles Brussels, Belgium
  • Josiane Lechat
    Université Libre de Bruxelles Brussels, Belgium
  • Contact author: Jacqueline Leybaert, PhD, Université Libre de Bruxelles, LAPSE, 50, avenue F. Roosevelt, C.P. 191, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium.
    Contact author: Jacqueline Leybaert, PhD, Université Libre de Bruxelles, LAPSE, 50, avenue F. Roosevelt, C.P. 191, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium.×
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: leybaert@ulb.ac.be
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 2001
Phonological Similarity Effects in Memory for Serial Order of Cued Speech
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2001, Vol. 44, 949-963. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/074)
History: Received September 25, 2000 , Accepted June 11, 2001
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2001, Vol. 44, 949-963. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/074)
History: Received September 25, 2000; Accepted June 11, 2001
Web of Science® Times Cited: 12

Experiment I investigated memory for serial order by congenitally, profoundly deaf individuals, 6–22 years old, for words presented via Cued Speech (CS) without sound. CS is a system that resolves the ambiguity inherent in speechreading through the addition of manual cues. The phonological components of CS are mouth shape, hand shape, and hand placement. Of interest was whether the recall of serial order was lower for lists of words similar in both mouth shape and hand placement, or similar in mouth shape only, or in hand placement only than for control lists designed to minimize these similarities. Deaf participants showed lower performance on the three similar lists than the control lists, suggesting that deaf individuals use the phonology of CS to support their recall. In Experiment II, the same lists were administered to two groups of hearing participants. One group, experienced producers of CS, received the CS stimuli without sound; the other group, unfamiliar with CS, received the CS stimuli audiovisually. Participants experienced with CS showed no effect of hand placement similarity, suggesting that this effect may be related to the linguistic experience of deaf participants. The recency effect was greater in the hearing group provided with sound, indicating that the traces left by auditory stimuli are perceptually more salient than those left by the visual stimuli encountered in CS.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by a grant from the Fondation Van Goethem-Brichant and from the Fondation Houtman. The writing of this paper was partly supported by grants from the Belgian Ministry of Scientific Policy (ARC “The structure of the mental lexicon: A multilevel approach to the multiple representations of words”) and from the A.N.A.H. (Association Nationale d’Aide aux Handicapés, Belgium). We would like to thank the pupils, the staff, and the parents of the Centre Comprendre et Parler, Belgium, for their kind cooperation; Daniela Marchetti for her help in designing the material and data collecting of Experiment I; Francis Goossens for his help in videotaping and videoediting; Murielle d’Hondt for commenting an earlier version of this paper; and Carol LaSasso for correcting the English. We also thank Carol De Filippo and anonymous reviewers for their comments on earlier versions and for suggesting that we consider perceptual errors in interpreting the results. Preliminary versions of this paper were presented at the AVSP’97 conference in Rhodes and the ICP in Stockholm (July 2000).
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