Motor Control in Children and Adults During a Non-Speech Oral Task Although decreased accuracy and increased variability of movement is a common developmental finding, the nature of these performance patterns remains poorly understood. The present study examined the accuracy and stability of several aspects of oral motor control. Specifically, we examined the control of absolute timing (temporal parameterization), absolute amplitude (amplitude ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 2001
Motor Control in Children and Adults During a Non-Speech Oral Task
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Heather M. Clark
    Department of Speech Pathology & Audiology University of Iowa Iowa City
  • Donald A. Robin
    Department of Speech Pathology & Audiology University of Iowa and National Center for Voice Iowa City
  • Gail McCullagh
    Department of Speech Pathology & Audiology University of Iowa Iowa City
  • Richard A. Schmidt
    Department of Psychology University of California Los Angeles
  • Contact author: Heather M. Clark, PhD, Appalachian State University, Department of Language, Reading & Exceptionalities, Boone NC 28608.
    Contact author: Heather M. Clark, PhD, Appalachian State University, Department of Language, Reading & Exceptionalities, Boone NC 28608.×
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: clarkhm@appstate.edu
  • Currently affiliated with Department of Language, Reading & Exceptionalities, Appalachian State University, Boone, NC
    Currently affiliated with Department of Language, Reading & Exceptionalities, Appalachian State University, Boone, NC×
  • Currently affiliated with Department of Communicative Disorders, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA
    Currently affiliated with Department of Communicative Disorders, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA×
  • Currently affiliated with Department of Speech and Hearing Science, Ohio State University, Columbus
    Currently affiliated with Department of Speech and Hearing Science, Ohio State University, Columbus×
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 2001
Motor Control in Children and Adults During a Non-Speech Oral Task
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2001, Vol. 44, 1015-1025. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/080)
History: Received September 5, 2000 , Accepted May 21, 2001
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2001, Vol. 44, 1015-1025. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/080)
History: Received September 5, 2000; Accepted May 21, 2001
Web of Science® Times Cited: 16

Although decreased accuracy and increased variability of movement is a common developmental finding, the nature of these performance patterns remains poorly understood. The present study examined the accuracy and stability of several aspects of oral motor control. Specifically, we examined the control of absolute timing (temporal parameterization), absolute amplitude (amplitude parameterization), and relative timing and amplitude (generalized motor programs) in children and adults during a lip plus jaw opening and closing task. As was the case with similar reports, we found that children were both less accurate and less stable in their assignment of temporal and amplitude parameters. However, we further found that although children's underlying movement patterns were less accurate than those of adults, children exhibited similar variability in their generalized motor programs. The results are discussed within the framework of a schema model of motor control (Schmidt, 1975) with reference to the strategic allocation of resources during motor learning (e.g., Clark & Robin, 1998).

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by NIDCD Center Grant No DC00976. The authors wish to acknowledge Martin Milder for developing the experimental software. We express our gratitude to Kirrie Ballard and Gabrielle Wulf for their thoughtful suggestions on earlier versions of this manuscript.
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