Effects of Speaking Rate on the Control of Vocal Fold Vibration Clinical Implications of Active and Passive Aspects of Devoicing Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 2001
Effects of Speaking Rate on the Control of Vocal Fold Vibration
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Victor Boucher
    University of Ottawa Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
  • Mario Lamontagne
    University of Ottawa Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 2001
Effects of Speaking Rate on the Control of Vocal Fold Vibration
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2001, Vol. 44, 1005-1014. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/079)
History: Received December 2, 2000 , Accepted May 21, 2001
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2001, Vol. 44, 1005-1014. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/079)
History: Received December 2, 2000; Accepted May 21, 2001
Web of Science® Times Cited: 8

Stevens (1991) has suggested that, while speakers control glottal apertures in producing consonants, the buildup of intraoral pressure during an oral closure creates decreases in transglottal flow, which can, in itself, reduce or halt vocal fold vibrations. The object of this study was to determine whether speakers can take advantage of such pressure effects in controlling the voicing attributes of intervocalic stops. Intraoral pressure, vocal fold vibration (Lx portions of electroglottograms), and electromyographic (EMG) activity of the orbicularis oris inferior were monitored for 6 subjects while they produced at “slow,” “normal,” and “fast” speaking rates utterances containing intervocalic stops /p/ and /b/. Product-moment correlations between the intervocalic pressure rises and the amplitude contour of Lx showed strong negative relationships at normal-to-fast rates of speech. However, this relationship was not maintained at slower rates, where decreases in the amplitude of Lx sometimes occurred before the onset of EMG activity in the labial adductor. The findings suggest that, at normal-to-fast rates of speech, speakers can use the passive effects of pressure in controlling vocal fold vibration for stop consonants.

Acknowledgments
We thank Dr. Gordon Robertson (Human Kinetics, University of Ottawa) and Michael Marcoux (Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa) for their assistance in the development of some of the instrumentation used in the present study.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access