Programmed Stuttering Treatment for Children: Comparison of Two Establishment Programs Through Transfer, Maintenance, and Follow-Up Two different Establishment programs, Delayed Auditory Feedback (DAF) and Gradual Increase in Length and Complexity of Utterance (GILCU), for improving the fluency of school-age children who stutter, were compared. The programs were carried out by 12 clinicians under supervision with 24 clients (12 elementary and 12 junior/senior high school) in ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1995
Programmed Stuttering Treatment for Children: Comparison of Two Establishment Programs Through Transfer, Maintenance, and Follow-Up
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Bruce P. Ryan
    Behavioral Sciences Institute Monterey, CA
  • Barbara Van Kirk Ryan
    Behavioral Sciences Institute Monterey, CA
  • Contact author: Bruce P. Ryan, PhD, Communicative Disorders Department, 305, California State University, Long Beach, Long Beach, CA 90840. E-mail: bpryan@csulb.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / School-Based Settings / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1995
Programmed Stuttering Treatment for Children: Comparison of Two Establishment Programs Through Transfer, Maintenance, and Follow-Up
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1995, Vol. 38, 61-75. doi:10.1044/jshr.3801.61
History: Received January 3, 1994 , Accepted July 22, 1994
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1995, Vol. 38, 61-75. doi:10.1044/jshr.3801.61
History: Received January 3, 1994; Accepted July 22, 1994

Two different Establishment programs, Delayed Auditory Feedback (DAF) and Gradual Increase in Length and Complexity of Utterance (GILCU), for improving the fluency of school-age children who stutter, were compared. The programs were carried out by 12 clinicians under supervision with 24 clients (12 elementary and 12 junior/senior high school) in the schools. Both programs produced important improvement in fluency in 23/24 (96%) of the children in a reasonable time period (7.9 hours). Generally, the two programs were similar in performance. The only difference (between GILCU and DAF) was that the GILCU program provided initially for better generalization of fluency. Transfer and Maintenance programs (10.4 hours) demonstrated that the children from the two Establishment programs performed in a similar manner and that the Transfer and Maintenance Programs were helpful. In a total of 18.3 hours of establishment, transfer, and maintenance treatment, 11 subjects, who completed the programs, reduced their stuttering from 7.9 SW/M to .8 SW/M at a 14-month follow-up showing that the children had maintained their fluency. Clinicians’ performances contributed to the effectiveness and efficiency of the programs.

Acknowledgments
We thank the three California public school districts of Palo Alto: Peggy Tuder, supervisor, and clinicians Jean Sidwell, Jane Stocklin, Gloria McConnell, and Barbara Bean; San Jose: Bernita Gross, coordinator, clinicians Barbara Ellingson, Florence Goehler, Annette Sobi, and Edna McPherson; and San Luis Obispo: Bill Kent, coordinator, clinicians Kathy High, Doreen Smith, Diane Adorno, and Jackie Steele. We thank Burl Gray for continued, multifaceted consultation on the project during its operation. We are indebted to Walter H. Moore for statistical consultation. This project was funded by the Bureau of Education of the Handicapped, DHEW, Project number 232456, grant number OEG-0–72–4422.
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