Perspectives on the Edinburgh Study of Speech Breathing This article offers critical perspectives on the Edinburgh study of speech breathing reported in this journal (Draper, Ladefoged, & Whitteridge, 1959) and elsewhere (Draper, Ladefoged, & Whitteridge, 1960; Ladefoged, Draper, & Whitteridge, 1958). These perspectives concern: (a) errors in establishing a backdrop of mechanical information; (b) discrepancies between data and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1995
Perspectives on the Edinburgh Study of Speech Breathing
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Thomas J. Hixon
    National Center for Neurogenic Communication Disorders University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Gary Weismer
    Department of Communicative Disorders University of Wisconsin, Madison
  • Contact author: Thomas J. Hixon, PhD, Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721. E-mail: durango@cnet.shs.arizona.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1995
Perspectives on the Edinburgh Study of Speech Breathing
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1995, Vol. 38, 42-60. doi:10.1044/jshr.3801.42
History: Received March 30, 1994 , Accepted July 19, 1994
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1995, Vol. 38, 42-60. doi:10.1044/jshr.3801.42
History: Received March 30, 1994; Accepted July 19, 1994

This article offers critical perspectives on the Edinburgh study of speech breathing reported in this journal (Draper, Ladefoged, & Whitteridge, 1959) and elsewhere (Draper, Ladefoged, & Whitteridge, 1960; Ladefoged, Draper, & Whitteridge, 1958). These perspectives concern: (a) errors in establishing a backdrop of mechanical information; (b) discrepancies between data and statements about them; (c) counterpredictive features between data and other knowledge about breathing; and (d) inadequacies in acquiring, portraying, and interpreting electromyographic information relative to the muscular contributions of different parts of the breathing apparatus.

Acknowledgments
The concepts presented in this article were developed under the support of Grants NS-09656, NS-13274, NS-21574, NS-41350, DC-00281, DC-00319, and DC-01409 from the National Institutes of Health. We are grateful to the following individuals for their consultation on various portions of this work: Robert Banzett, Michael Goldman, Wilbur Gould, Jeannette Hoit, Robert Lansing, Anne Rochet, Stephen Loring, Jere Mead, and Thomas Sears. We respectfully dedicate this article to the memory of Wilbur (Jim) Gould.
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