Judgments of Stuttered and Nonstuttered Intervals by Recognized Authorities in Stuttering Research The study reported in this paper gathered judgments of stuttering on brief (5.0-sec) audiovisual speech samples taken from six adults who stuttered. Judgments were made by 10 highly experienced authorities on stuttering treatment and research, located in seven different universities or clinical research centers. Results showed considerable agreement between pairs ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1995
Judgments of Stuttered and Nonstuttered Intervals by Recognized Authorities in Stuttering Research
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Anne K. Cordes
    University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Roger J. Ingham
    University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Contact author: Anne K. Cordes, PhD, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106–7050. E-mail: sph1anne@ucsbuxa.ucsb.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1995
Judgments of Stuttered and Nonstuttered Intervals by Recognized Authorities in Stuttering Research
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1995, Vol. 38, 33-41. doi:10.1044/jshr.3801.33
History: Received April 18, 1994 , Accepted July 8, 1994
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1995, Vol. 38, 33-41. doi:10.1044/jshr.3801.33
History: Received April 18, 1994; Accepted July 8, 1994

The study reported in this paper gathered judgments of stuttering on brief (5.0-sec) audiovisual speech samples taken from six adults who stuttered. Judgments were made by 10 highly experienced authorities on stuttering treatment and research, located in seven different universities or clinical research centers. Results showed considerable agreement between pairs of judges working in the same center, but large and potentially fundamental differences were identified in the amount of stuttering recorded in different centers. Approximately 40% of the 5.0-sec speech intervals used in this study were assigned the same judgment, either Stuttered or Nonstuttered, by all judges on two judgment occasions. The possibility that these intervals may serve as a core for establishing an across-center standard for behavioral judgments of stuttering is discussed.

Acknowledgments
The authors express their sincerest appreciation and thanks to the researchers and clinicians who took the time to serve as judges for this study, and who were so understanding about repeating the task on a second occasion. Our thanks also to Richard Moglia, who provided technical support, and to Peter Frank, who wrote the software for isolating speech intervals from the laserdisks. Preliminary results of this study were included in a miniseminar presented at the Annual Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association in Anaheim, CA, in November 1993. This research was supported by grant #DC00060, awarded to R. J. Ingham by the National Institutes of Health.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access