The Role of Experimental Research in Validating Facilitated Communication: A Reply I am pleased to be given a chance to comment on the thought-provoking set of responses to my article on facilitated communication (Duchan, 1993). I find this opportunity appealing for several reasons. First, I appreciate having a place for debate in our academic journals, rather than the media or ... Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   February 01, 1995
The Role of Experimental Research in Validating Facilitated Communication: A Reply
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Judith Felson Duchan
    State University of New York at Buffalo Department of Communication Disorders and Sciences 110 Park Hall Buffalo, NY 14260
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Language / Letters to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   February 01, 1995
The Role of Experimental Research in Validating Facilitated Communication: A Reply
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1995, Vol. 38, 206-210. doi:10.1044/jshr.3801.206
History: Received July 6, 1994 , Accepted August 4, 1994
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1995, Vol. 38, 206-210. doi:10.1044/jshr.3801.206
History: Received July 6, 1994; Accepted August 4, 1994
I am pleased to be given a chance to comment on the thought-provoking set of responses to my article on facilitated communication (Duchan, 1993). I find this opportunity appealing for several reasons. First, I appreciate having a place for debate in our academic journals, rather than the media or in the courts, which have been the primary forums for airing the issues related to this important topic. Second, I am glad for the chance to respond to the new series of published articles that have appeared since I completed my article in July of 1993. Third, I take delight in finding that all three responses target one issue from the many possible: the usefulness of experimental research for studying the validity of facilitated communication. Their unity makes my response much easier. Finally, I like having to address these three respondents together. Their ideas are instructive as a set because they represent perspectives along a continuum of opinion. Their opinions range from a strict adherence to the highly controlled experimental approach (Fried-Oken, Paul, & Fay), to a less strict one (Yoder), to one of distrust (Silliman).
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