Effect of Utterance Length and Meaningfulness on the Speech Initiation Times of Children Who Stutter and Children Who Do Not Stutter The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of utterance length and meaningfulness on the speech initiation times of children who stutter and children who do not stutter. Subjects were 36 elementary school students (half of whom stutter, matched by age, grade, and gender). Each child repeated short ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1995
Effect of Utterance Length and Meaningfulness on the Speech Initiation Times of Children Who Stutter and Children Who Do Not Stutter
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Wendy S. Maske-Cash
    Department of Speech-Language Pathology Barrow Neurological Institute St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center Phoenix, AZ
  • Richard F. Curlee
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences University of Arizona Tucson
  • Contact author: Wendy S. Maske-Cash, Department of Speech-Language Pathology, Barrow Neurological Institute, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, P.O. Box 2071, Phoenix, AZ 85001–2071.
    Contact author: Wendy S. Maske-Cash, Department of Speech-Language Pathology, Barrow Neurological Institute, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, P.O. Box 2071, Phoenix, AZ 85001–2071.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1995
Effect of Utterance Length and Meaningfulness on the Speech Initiation Times of Children Who Stutter and Children Who Do Not Stutter
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1995, Vol. 38, 18-25. doi:10.1044/jshr.3801.18
History: Received January 19, 1993 , Accepted June 16, 1994
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1995, Vol. 38, 18-25. doi:10.1044/jshr.3801.18
History: Received January 19, 1993; Accepted June 16, 1994

The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of utterance length and meaningfulness on the speech initiation times of children who stutter and children who do not stutter. Subjects were 36 elementary school students (half of whom stutter, matched by age, grade, and gender). Each child repeated short meaningful, long meaningful, and long nonce utterances in response to a visual cue. Nonstuttering, stuttering-only, and stuttering-plus (children with concomitant speech and/or language problems) children responded differently to utterance length and meaningfulness. This suggests that the three groups may process speech motor events for verbal responses differently.

Acknowledgments
This study was completed by the first author as a master’s thesis at the University of Arizona under the direction of the second author. The first author extends her warmest thanks to the second author for his tireless energy and always-appreciated advice, comments, and support as both a friend and mentor. Sincere appreciation is extended to Anthony DeFeo, Ying Yong Qi, Ralph Shelton, and Peter Watson of the University of Arizona. We also thank the administrators, school principals, speech-language pathologists, teachers, and especially the students of the Tucson Unified School District who cooperated with and participated in this project.
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