Speaking Fundamental Frequency Changes Over Time in Women: A Longitudinal Study Archival recordings of the human voice are a relatively untapped resource for both longitudinal and cross-sectional research into the aging voice. Through the availability of collections of old sound recordings, speech pathologists and voice scientists have access to a wealth of data for research purposes. This article reports on the ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 1995
Speaking Fundamental Frequency Changes Over Time in Women: A Longitudinal Study
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Alison Russell
    Department of Speech Pathology Flinders University of South Australia Adelaide
  • Lynda Penny
    Department of Speech Pathology Flinders University of South Australia Adelaide
  • Cecilia Pemberton
    Department of Speech Pathology Flinders University of South Australia Adelaide
  • Contact author: Alison Russell, Speech Pathology Department, Flinders University of South Australia, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide 5001, South Australia. E-mail: alison@sp.flinders.edu.au
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 1995
Speaking Fundamental Frequency Changes Over Time in Women: A Longitudinal Study
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1995, Vol. 38, 101-109. doi:10.1044/jshr.3801.101
History: Received February 28, 1994 , Accepted August 1, 1994
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1995, Vol. 38, 101-109. doi:10.1044/jshr.3801.101
History: Received February 28, 1994; Accepted August 1, 1994

Archival recordings of the human voice are a relatively untapped resource for both longitudinal and cross-sectional research into the aging voice. Through the availability of collections of old sound recordings, speech pathologists and voice scientists have access to a wealth of data for research purposes. This article reports on the use of such archival data to examine the changes in speaking fundamental frequency (SFF) in a group of Australian women's voices over the past 50 years, and discusses the benefits and problems associated with using archival data. Recordings made in 1945 of women were compared with recordings of the same women made in 1993 to investigate the changes in SFF with age. The results demonstrate a significant lowering of SFF with age in this group of Australian women. The implications for the interpretation of cross-sectional data on the aging voice, the use of archival data in voice research, and the need for further research using archival data are discussed.

Acknowledgments
The authors gratefully acknowledge the assistance of Professor Hollien and the family of Mrs. de Pinto in obtaining the original recordings. The authors wish to thank the women who willingly had their voices recorded again; Jane Horgan for clerical and administrative support; Julie Connor, Angela O’Sullivan, and Jocelyn Priestley for their assistance in distance recordings; and Willem van Steenbrugge, Paul McCormack, and Jennifer Oates for their assistance with the manuscript. This research was supported by the Speech Pathology Department of Flinders University of South Australia.
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