Influence of Mothers’ Slower Speech on Their Children’s Speech Rate This study investigated the effects on children’s speech rate when their mothers talked more slowly. Six mothers and their normally speaking 3-year-olds (3 girls and 3 boys) were studied using single-subject A-B-A-B designs. Conversational speech rates of mothers were reduced by approximately half in the experimental (B) conditions. Five of ... Research Note
Research Note  |   August 01, 2001
Influence of Mothers’ Slower Speech on Their Children’s Speech Rate
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Barry Guitar, PhD
    The University of Vermont Burlington
    Department of Communication Sciences, 400 Pomeroy Hall, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405-0010
  • Lisa Marchinkoski
    The University of Vermont Burlington
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: bguitar@zoo.uvm.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Notes
Research Note   |   August 01, 2001
Influence of Mothers’ Slower Speech on Their Children’s Speech Rate
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2001, Vol. 44, 853-861. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/067)
History: Received September 8, 1999 , Accepted April 6, 2001
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2001, Vol. 44, 853-861. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/067)
History: Received September 8, 1999; Accepted April 6, 2001
Web of Science® Times Cited: 14

This study investigated the effects on children’s speech rate when their mothers talked more slowly. Six mothers and their normally speaking 3-year-olds (3 girls and 3 boys) were studied using single-subject A-B-A-B designs. Conversational speech rates of mothers were reduced by approximately half in the experimental (B) conditions. Five of the six children appeared to reduce their speech rates when their mothers spoke more slowly. This was confirmed by paired t tests (p < .05) that showed significant decreases in the 5 children’s speech rate over the two B conditions. These findings suggest that when mothers substantially decrease their speech rates in a controlled situation, their children also decrease their speech rates. Clinical implications are discussed.

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