The Modification of Speech Naturalness During Rhythmic Stimulation Treatment of Stuttering This study investigated the modification of speech naturalness during stuttering treatment. It systematically replicated an earlier study (Ingham & Onslow, 1985) that demonstrated that unnatural-sounding stutter-free speech could be shaped into more natural-sounding stutter-free speech by using regular feedback of speech-naturalness ratings during speaking tasks. In the present study, the ... Research Note
Research Note  |   August 01, 2001
The Modification of Speech Naturalness During Rhythmic Stimulation Treatment of Stuttering
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Roger J. Ingham, PhD
    University of California Santa Barbara
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106
  • Wendy Sato
    University of California Santa Barbara
  • Patrick Finn
    University of Arizona Tucson
  • Heather Belknap
    University of California Santa Barbara
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Speech / Research Notes
Research Note   |   August 01, 2001
The Modification of Speech Naturalness During Rhythmic Stimulation Treatment of Stuttering
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2001, Vol. 44, 841-852. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/066)
History: Received October 5, 2000 , Accepted February 28, 2001
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2001, Vol. 44, 841-852. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2001/066)
History: Received October 5, 2000; Accepted February 28, 2001
Web of Science® Times Cited: 7

This study investigated the modification of speech naturalness during stuttering treatment. It systematically replicated an earlier study (Ingham & Onslow, 1985) that demonstrated that unnatural-sounding stutter-free speech could be shaped into more natural-sounding stutter-free speech by using regular feedback of speech-naturalness ratings during speaking tasks. In the present study, the same procedure was used with three persons who stutter—2 adolescent girls and 1 adult man—during rhythmic stimulation conditions. The two adolescent participants spoke only English, but Spanish was the first and English the second language (ESL) of the adult participant. For the 2 adolescents, it was demonstrated that their unnatural-sounding rhythmic speech could be shaped to levels found among normally fluent speakers without losing the fluency-inducing benefits of rhythmic speech. The findings indicate that speech-naturalness feedback may be a powerful procedure for overcoming a problematic aspect of rhythmic speech treatments of stuttering. However, it was not possible to deliver reliable speech-naturalness feedback to the adult ESL speaker, who also displayed a strong dialect. The study highlights the need to find strategies to improve interjudge agreement when using speech-naturalness ratings with speakers who display a strong dialect.

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