Reliability of Clinicians' Judgments About Prolonged-Speech Targets Treatments for stuttering based on variants of Goldiamond's prolonged-speech procedure involve teaching clients to speak with novel speech patterns. Those speech patterns consist of specific skills, described with such terms as soft contacts, gentle onsets, and continuous vocalization. It might be expected that effective client learning of such speech skills ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1998
Reliability of Clinicians' Judgments About Prolonged-Speech Targets
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mark Onslow
    Australian Stuttering Research Centre The University of Sydney Sydney
  • Sue O'Brian
    Australian Stuttering Research Centre The University of Sydney Sydney
  • Contact author: Mark Onslow, PhD, Australian Stuttering Research Centre, The University of Sydney, P.O. Box 170, Lidcombe NSW 2141, Australia. e-mail: m.onslow@cchs.usyd
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1998
Reliability of Clinicians' Judgments About Prolonged-Speech Targets
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1998, Vol. 41, 969-975. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4105.969
History: Received January 21, 1997 , Accepted October 28, 1997
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1998, Vol. 41, 969-975. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4105.969
History: Received January 21, 1997; Accepted October 28, 1997

Treatments for stuttering based on variants of Goldiamond's prolonged-speech procedure involve teaching clients to speak with novel speech patterns. Those speech patterns consist of specific skills, described with such terms as soft contacts, gentle onsets, and continuous vocalization. It might be expected that effective client learning of such speech skills would be dependent on clinicians' ability to reliably identify any departures from the correct production of such speech targets. The present study investigated clinicians' reliability in detecting such errors during a prolonged-speech treatment program. Results showed questionable intraclinician agreement and poor interclinician agreement. Nonetheless, the prolonged-speech program in question is known to be effective in controlling stuttered speech. The clinical and theoretical implications of these findings are discussed.

Acknowledgments
The authors appreciate the efforts made by the clinicians in the conduct of this study and the input of Anne Cordes in the writing of the manuscript.
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