Maternal Responsivity Predicts the Prelinguistic Communication Intervention That Facilitates Generalized Intentional Communication Family systems theory posits that the relative effectiveness of early interventions will vary depending on various aspects of the family. This study tested whether maternal responsivity would predict the extent to which Prelinguistic Milieu Teaching (PMT) facilitated generalized intentional communication better than a contrast treatment that was conducted in a ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1998
Maternal Responsivity Predicts the Prelinguistic Communication Intervention That Facilitates Generalized Intentional Communication
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Paul J. Yoder
    Vanderbilt University Nashville, TN
  • Steven F. Warren
    Vanderbilt University Nashville, TN
  • Contact author: Paul Yoder, PhD, GPC Box 328, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, 37203
Article Information
Special Populations / Language Disorders / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1998
Maternal Responsivity Predicts the Prelinguistic Communication Intervention That Facilitates Generalized Intentional Communication
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1998, Vol. 41, 1207-1219. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4105.1207
History: Received May 5, 1997 , Accepted April 8, 1998
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1998, Vol. 41, 1207-1219. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4105.1207
History: Received May 5, 1997; Accepted April 8, 1998

Family systems theory posits that the relative effectiveness of early interventions will vary depending on various aspects of the family. This study tested whether maternal responsivity would predict the extent to which Prelinguistic Milieu Teaching (PMT) facilitated generalized intentional communication better than a contrast treatment that was conducted in a small group by a responsive adult (i.e., Responsive Small Group, RSG). Fifty-eight children with developmental disabilities in the prelinguistic communication period of development were randomly assigned to one of the two staff-implemented treatment groups. Thirty were assigned to RSG; 28 were assigned to PMT. Mothers were kept naive to the intervention methods, hypotheses, and measures. In families with mothers who responded to a high percentage of the children's communication acts at the pre-treatment period, the children in the PMT group used more frequent intentional communication in post-treatment generalization sessions with a trainer and mothers than did children in the RSG group. In the families with mothers who responded to fewer than 39% of their children's communication acts, children in the RSG intervention used more frequent intentional communication in post-treatment generalization sessions with the mothers than did children in the PMT intervention. Other family variables and no child variables that we measured could account for these findings.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by NICHD grant RO1HD27594 and U.S. Department of Education grant HO23C20152. Thanks is given to Carol Chapman, Kim Gilbert, Dana Oman, Betsy Reineke, Melissa Crim, Hope Van Beselaere, Anne Edwards, Sandy Cooper, and Martha Shy for recruiting subjects, conducting the training, and coding videotaped procedures; to Rebecca McCathren for coding the level of play data; to the Susan Gray School, Duncanwood, and Heads Up Early Intervention programs for allowing us to recruit families through their programs; and to the families that participated in the study for their cooperation and trust.
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