Participation in Cooperative Learning Activities by Children With Specific Language Impairment This study examined the involvement of children with specific language impairment (SLI) in a cooperative group task. Subjects consisted of 6 target children with SLI (ages 8;10 to 12;5), 6 target children matched for chronological age (CA), and 6 target children with similar language skills (LS). Each target subject interacted ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1998
Participation in Cooperative Learning Activities by Children With Specific Language Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Bonnie Brinton
    Brigham Young University Provo, UT
  • Martin Fujiki
    Brigham Young University Provo, UT
  • Lisa M. Higbee
    Brigham Young University Provo, UT
  • Contact author: Bonnie Brinton, PhD, Audiology & Speech Pathology, Brigham Young University, 136 TLRB, PO Box 28605, Provo, UT 84602-8605
Article Information
Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1998
Participation in Cooperative Learning Activities by Children With Specific Language Impairment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1998, Vol. 41, 1193-1206. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4105.1193
History: Received July 28, 1997 , Accepted March 28, 1998
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1998, Vol. 41, 1193-1206. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4105.1193
History: Received July 28, 1997; Accepted March 28, 1998

This study examined the involvement of children with specific language impairment (SLI) in a cooperative group task. Subjects consisted of 6 target children with SLI (ages 8;10 to 12;5), 6 target children matched for chronological age (CA), and 6 target children with similar language skills (LS). Each target subject interacted with 2 peers of the same age and gender. This resulted in 54 subjects participating in 18 triadic interactions (each involving 1 target subject and 2 partners). Each triad of children worked together to build a cardboard periscope. Verbal and nonverbal collaborative activity were analyzed during the interactions. All members of the CA and LS triads were highly collaborative and worked and talked together while assembling the periscope. Four of the children with SLI played very minor roles in the cooperative work within their triads. Their verbal contributions were limited, and their nonverbal activity was minimal. When children with SLI did collaborate in building the periscope, they performed less specialized tasks than did their partners.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported, in part, by a research grant from the David O. McKay School of Education, Brigham Young University. We would like to thank Dr. Julie Washington and two anonymous reviewers for their helpful comments. We would also like to acknowledge and thank Ms. Lee Robinson and Ms. Julie C. Spencer for assistance in data collection. Finally, we would like to thank the administrators, speech-language pathologists, teachers, parents, and students of Alpine School District for their assistance and cooperation.
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