Speech Perception Performance in Experienced Cochlear-Implant Patients Receiving the SPEAK Processing Strategy in the Nucleus Spectra-22 Cochlear Implant Sixteen experienced cochlear implant patients with a wide range of speechperception abilities received the SPEAK processing strategy in the Nucleus Spectra-22 cochlear implant. Speech perception was assessed in quiet and in noise with SPEAK and with the patients' previous strategies (for most, Multipeak) at the study onset, as well as ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1998
Speech Perception Performance in Experienced Cochlear-Implant Patients Receiving the SPEAK Processing Strategy in the Nucleus Spectra-22 Cochlear Implant
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Aaron J. Parkinson
    Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery University of Iowa Iowa City
  • Wendy S. Parkinson
    Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery University of Iowa Iowa City
  • Richard S. Tyler
    Departments of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and Speech Pathology and Audiology University of Iowa Iowa City
  • Mary W. Lowder
    Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery University of Iowa Iowa City
  • Bruce J. Gantz
    Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery University of Iowa Iowa City
  • Contact author: Aaron Parkinson, MA, FAAA, C-AAA, Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, E230 GH 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, IA 52242-1078. Email: aaronparkinson@uiowa.edu
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1998
Speech Perception Performance in Experienced Cochlear-Implant Patients Receiving the SPEAK Processing Strategy in the Nucleus Spectra-22 Cochlear Implant
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1998, Vol. 41, 1073-1087. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4105.1073
History: Received October 16, 1997 , Accepted July 2, 1998
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1998, Vol. 41, 1073-1087. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4105.1073
History: Received October 16, 1997; Accepted July 2, 1998

Sixteen experienced cochlear implant patients with a wide range of speechperception abilities received the SPEAK processing strategy in the Nucleus Spectra-22 cochlear implant. Speech perception was assessed in quiet and in noise with SPEAK and with the patients' previous strategies (for most, Multipeak) at the study onset, as well as after using SPEAK for 6 months. Comparisons were made within and across the two test sessions to elucidate possible learning effects. Patients were also asked to rate the strategies on seven speech recognition and sound quality scales. After 6 months' experience with SPEAK, patients showed significantly improved mean performance on a range of speech recognition measures in quiet and noise. When mean subjective ratings were compared over time there were no significant differences noted between strategies. However, many individuals rated the SPEAK strategy better for two or more of the seven subjective measures. Ratings for "appreciation of music" and "quality of my own voice" in particular were generally higher for SPEAK. Improvements were realized by patients with a wide range of speech perception abilities, including those with little or no open-set speech recognition.

Acknowledgments
Supported (in part) by research grant number 2 P50 DC 00242-11 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health; Grant RR00059 from the General Clinical Research Centers Program, Division of Research Resources, NIH; the Lions Clubs International Foundation; and the Iowa Lions Foundation. The authors would like to express their appreciation to the patients who participated in this study. The contributions of Dr. Sandra Gordon-Salant, Dr. Larry E. Humes, and two anonymous reviewers were also greatly appreciated
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