Effect of Tape Recording on Perturbation Measures Tape recorders have been shown to affect measures of voice perturbation. Few studies, however, have been conducted to quantitatively justify the use or exclusion of certain types of recorders in voice perturbation studies. This study used sinusoidal and triangular waves and synthesized vowels to compare perturbation measures extracted from directly ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1998
Effect of Tape Recording on Perturbation Measures
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jack Jiang
    Northwestern University Medical School Chicago, IL
  • Emily Lin
    Northwestern University Medical School Chicago, IL
  • David G. Hanson
    Northwestern University Medical School Chicago, IL
  • Contact author: Jack Jiang, Department of Otolaryngology– Head and Neck Surgery, Northwestern University Medical School, Searle Building 12-561, 303 E. Chicago Ave., Chicago, IL. Email: jjiang@nwu.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1998
Effect of Tape Recording on Perturbation Measures
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1998, Vol. 41, 1031-1041. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4105.1031
History: Received January 7, 1998 , Accepted January 8, 1998
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1998, Vol. 41, 1031-1041. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4105.1031
History: Received January 7, 1998; Accepted January 8, 1998

Tape recorders have been shown to affect measures of voice perturbation. Few studies, however, have been conducted to quantitatively justify the use or exclusion of certain types of recorders in voice perturbation studies. This study used sinusoidal and triangular waves and synthesized vowels to compare perturbation measures extracted from directly digitized signals with those recorded and played back through various tape recorders, including 3 models of digital audio tape recorders, 2 models of analog audio cassette tape recorders, and 2 models of video tape recorders. Signal contamination for frequency perturbation values was found to be consistently minimal with digital recorders (percent jitter=0.01%–0.02%), mildly increased with video recorders (0.05%–0.10%), moderately increased with a high-quality analog audio cassette tape recorder (0.15%), and most prominent with a low-quality analog audio cassette tape recorder (0.24%). Recorder effect on amplitude perturbation measures was lowest in digital recorders (percent shimmer = 0.09%–0.20%), mildly to moderately increased in video recorders and a high-quality analog audio cassette tape recorder (0.25%–0.45%), and most prominent in a low-quality analog audio cassette tape recorder (0.98%). The effect of cassette tape material, length of spooled tape, and duration of analysis were also tested and are discussed.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by grant numbers 5R01DC00254-9 and 5P60DC02764-01 from NIH-NIDCD to Northwestern University Medical School, Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery. We would like to thank Shie Qian for writing the data acquisition program, Michel Dalal for the data conversion program, and Mieoak Lee and Salman Kahn for their assistance in data processing.
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