Intentional Changes in Sound Pressure Level and Rate Their Impact on Measures of Respiration, Phonation, and Articulation Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1998
Intentional Changes in Sound Pressure Level and Rate
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Christopher Dromey
    Toronto Hospital University of Toronto Canada
  • Lorraine Olson Ramig
    University of Colorado Boulder Wilbur James Gould Voice Research Center Denver, CO
  • Contact author: Christopher Dromey, PhD, Department of Speech-Language Pathology, Toronto Hospital, BC-3–603, 399 Bathurst Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5T 2S8, Canada. Email: cdromey@playfair.utoronto.ca
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1998
Intentional Changes in Sound Pressure Level and Rate
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1998, Vol. 41, 1003-1018. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4105.1003
History: Received December 3, 1997 , Accepted May 4, 1998
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1998, Vol. 41, 1003-1018. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4105.1003
History: Received December 3, 1997; Accepted May 4, 1998

The purpose of the study was to compare the effects of changing sound pressure level (SPL) and rate on respiratory, phonatory, and articulatory behavior during sentence production. Ten subjects, 5 men and 5 women, repeated the sentence, "I sell a sapapple again," under 5 SPL and 5 rate conditions. From a multi-channel recording, measures were made of lung volume (LV), SPL, fundamental frequency (F0), semitone standard deviation (STSD), and upper and lower lip displacements and peak velocities. Loud speech led to increases in LV initiation, LV termination, F0, STSD, and articulatory displacements and peak velocities for both lips. Token-to-token variability in these articulatory measures generally decreased as SPL increased, whereas rate increases were associated with increased lip movement variability. LV excursion decreased as rate increased. F0 for the men and STSD for both genders increased with rate. Lower lip displacements became smaller for faster speech. The interspeaker differences in velocity change as a function of rate contrasted with the more consistent velocity performance across speakers for changes in SPL. Because SPL and rate change are targeted in therapy for dysarthria, the present data suggest directions for future research with disordered speakers.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by a Small Grant Award from the Dean of the Graduate School at the University of Colorado and by NIH Grant R01-DCO1150. We are grateful for the suggestions offered by the Associate Editor, Nicholas Schiavetti, by Monica McHenry, and by two anonymous reviewers.
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