Effect of Otitis Media With Effusion on Comodulation Masking Release in Children This study investigated comodulation masking release (CMR) in a group of children with a history of otitis media with effusion (OME) and a control group of children with no known history of ear disease. CMR was measured both in a monotic condition and in a dichotic condition (where comodulated flanking ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1994
Effect of Otitis Media With Effusion on Comodulation Masking Release in Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joseph W. Hall
    Division of Otolaryngology, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • John H. Grose
    Division of Otolaryngology, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Contact author: Joseph W. Hall, PhD, University of North Carolina, Division of Otolaryngology/Head & Neck Surgery, CB7070, Burnett-Womack Clinical Sciences Building, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7070.
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1994
Effect of Otitis Media With Effusion on Comodulation Masking Release in Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1994, Vol. 37, 1441-1449. doi:10.1044/jshr.3706.1441
History: Received October 19, 1993 , Accepted June 28, 1994
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1994, Vol. 37, 1441-1449. doi:10.1044/jshr.3706.1441
History: Received October 19, 1993; Accepted June 28, 1994

This study investigated comodulation masking release (CMR) in a group of children with a history of otitis media with effusion (OME) and a control group of children with no known history of ear disease. CMR was measured both in a monotic condition and in a dichotic condition (where comodulated flanking bands were added to the ear contralateral to the signal). CMR was measured before the insertion of pressure equalization tubes, approximately 1 to 3 months after surgery, and approximately 6 to 8 months after surgery. The results indicated that monotic CMRs were reduced in children who had hearing loss due to OME. Furthermore, the monotic CMR remained abnormally small even when threshold had returned to normal for 1 to 3 months. The monotic CMR was essentially normal 6 to 8 months following surgery. No differences were found between the two groups of children for the dichotic CMR.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by a grant from NIH NIDCD. We thank Debora Hatch and Madhu B. Dev for assistance in running subjects, data analysis, and for helpful discussions. We thank Zak Martinkosky for help with data analysis. Søren Buus, Wesley Grantham, and an anonymous reviewer provided helpful criticisms on a previous version of this manuscript.
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