Feature Analysis of Singleton Consonant Errors in Developmental Verbal Dyspraxia (DVD) The aim of this study is to quantify diagnostic characteristics related to consonant production of developmental verbal dyspraxia (DVD). For this, a paradigmatic and syntagmatic feature-value analysis of the consonant substitution and omission errors in DVD speech was conducted. Following a three-step procedure, eleven clear cases were selected from a ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1994
Feature Analysis of Singleton Consonant Errors in Developmental Verbal Dyspraxia (DVD)
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • G. Thoonen
    Child Neurology Center/Institute Medical Psychology, University Hospital Nijmegen, The Netherlands
  • B. Maassen
    Child Neurology Center/Institute Medical Psychology, University Hospital Nijmegen, The Netherlands
  • F. Gabreëls
    Child Neurology Center, University Hospital Nijmegen, The Netherlands
  • R. Schreuder
    Interfaculty Research Unit for Language and Speech, University of Nijmegen, The Netherlands
  • Contact author: Geert Thoonen, PhD, Interdisciplinary Child Neurology Center, University Hospital Nijmegen, P. O. Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen, The Netherlands. E-mail: MP_GT@AZNVXI.AZN.NL
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1994
Feature Analysis of Singleton Consonant Errors in Developmental Verbal Dyspraxia (DVD)
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1994, Vol. 37, 1424-1440. doi:10.1044/jshr.3706.1424
History: Received June 14, 1993 , Accepted June 23, 1994
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1994, Vol. 37, 1424-1440. doi:10.1044/jshr.3706.1424
History: Received June 14, 1993; Accepted June 23, 1994

The aim of this study is to quantify diagnostic characteristics related to consonant production of developmental verbal dyspraxia (DVD). For this, a paradigmatic and syntagmatic feature-value analysis of the consonant substitution and omission errors in DVD speech was conducted. Following a three-step procedure, eleven clear cases were selected from a group of 24 children with DVD. The consonants produced in a word and nonsense-word imitation task were phonetically transcribed and transferred to confusion matrices, which allows for a feature and feature-value analysis. The analysis revealed that children with DVD (a) show low percentages of retention for place and manner of articulation and voicing, due to high substitution and omission rates; (b) show a particularly low percentage of retention of place of articulation in words, which, together with error rate, is strongly related to severity of involvement; (c) are inconsistent in their feature realization and feature preference; and (d) show a high syntagmatic error rate. These results form a quantification of diagnostic characteristics. Unexpectedly, however, very few qualitative differences in error pattern were found between children with DVD and a group of 11 age-matched children with normal speech. Thus, although the children with DVD produced higher substitution and omission rates than children with normal speech, the speech profiles of both subject groups are similar. This result stresses the importance of interpreting profiles, not isolated symptoms. The hypothesis to consider DVD as a deficit in the phonological encoding process is discussed.

Acknowledgments
The Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO) is gratefully acknowledged for funding of this study. This research was conducted while G. Thoonen was supported by a PSYCHON-grant (560-256-043) from this organization awarded to B. Maassen. Parts of these data were presented at the 1992 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Convention, San Antonio, Texas.
The authors wish to thank Karen van Hulst and Bert de Swart for their help in data collection, transcription, and subject identification. The authors express their appreciation to the children who participated as subjects in this study and to the speech-language pathologists and classroom teachers who granted permission to conduct the testing and provided subject information. The useful comments and suggestions provided by C. Stoel-Gammon are also acknowledged and highly appreciated.
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