Comparison of Conversational-Recasting and Imitative Procedures for Training Grammatical Structures in Children With Specific Language Impairment The recent literature on language intervention has become increasingly focused upon developing treatments that more closely parallel normal language acquisition. However, there have been relatively few reports that directly compare imitative procedures to conversational-interactive interventions. The purpose of the present study was to compare the relative effectiveness of imitative intervention ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1994
Comparison of Conversational-Recasting and Imitative Procedures for Training Grammatical Structures in Children With Specific Language Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Stephen M. Camarata
    Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
  • Keith E. Nelson
    Pennsylvania State University, University Park
  • Mary N. Camarata
    Bill Wilkerson Center, Nashville, TN
  • Contact author: Stephen M. Camarata, Director, Scottish Rite Child Language Disorders Center, Division of Hearing & Speech Sciences, Station 17, Box 552, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232. E-mail: CAMARASM@CTRVAX.VANDERBILT.EDU
Article Information
Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1994
Comparison of Conversational-Recasting and Imitative Procedures for Training Grammatical Structures in Children With Specific Language Impairment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1994, Vol. 37, 1414-1423. doi:10.1044/jshr.3706.1414
History: Received October 19, 1993 , Accepted June 14, 1994
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1994, Vol. 37, 1414-1423. doi:10.1044/jshr.3706.1414
History: Received October 19, 1993; Accepted June 14, 1994

The recent literature on language intervention has become increasingly focused upon developing treatments that more closely parallel normal language acquisition. However, there have been relatively few reports that directly compare imitative procedures to conversational-interactive interventions. The purpose of the present study was to compare the relative effectiveness of imitative intervention and conversational recast language intervention applied to a wide range of grammatical morpheme and complex sentence targets in 21 children with specific language impairment. The results indicated that although both kinds of treatments were effective in triggering acquisition of most targets, consistently fewer presentations to first spontaneous use were required in the conversational procedure. In addition, the transition from elicited production to generalized spontaneous production was more rapid under conversationinteractive treatment. Finally, although imitation treatment was more effective in generating elicited production, a significantly greater number of spontaneous productions occurred under the conversational training procedures. The theoretical and applied ramifications of these findings are discussed.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported in part by the National Institutes of Health, NIDCD, Research Grant NS-26437, and by an endowment to the first author from the Scottish Rite Foundation of Nashville. We wish to thank Mindy Harmer, Cindy Carter, Laura Epstein, Katie McShane, Sara Beckman, and Christine Cosmides for their help with the data collection. Thanks are also extended to Martin Fujiki, Marc Fey, Paul Yoder, and an anonymous reviewer for providing comments on earlier versions of the manuscript.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access