Use of Phonological Information in a Word-Finding Treatment for Children Two children with word-finding deficits characterized largely by semantic substitutions participated in a treatment involving phonological information about target words. The treatment was motivated by models of naming where semantic information and phonological information are stored in independent ordered components. Given such models, it is possible to characterize some semantic ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1994
Use of Phonological Information in a Word-Finding Treatment for Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Karla K. McGregor
    Northwestern University Evanston, IL
  • Contact author: Karla K. McGregor, PhD, Speech and Language Pathology, Northwestern University, 2299 Campus Drive North, Evanston, IL 60208-3570. E-mail: mcgregor@casbah.acns.nwu.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1994
Use of Phonological Information in a Word-Finding Treatment for Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1994, Vol. 37, 1381-1393. doi:10.1044/jshr.3706.1381
History: Received August 24, 1993 , Accepted May 13, 1994
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1994, Vol. 37, 1381-1393. doi:10.1044/jshr.3706.1381
History: Received August 24, 1993; Accepted May 13, 1994

Two children with word-finding deficits characterized largely by semantic substitutions participated in a treatment involving phonological information about target words. The treatment was motivated by models of naming where semantic information and phonological information are stored in independent ordered components. Given such models, it is possible to characterize some semantic word-finding substitutions as well as phonological word-finding substitutions as the result of breakdown at the level of the phonological output representation. The treatment was organized according to a single-subject multiple baseline design across behaviors and subjects. As hypothesized, the phonologically based treatment resulted in reduction not only of occasional phonological word-finding substitutions but also of the large number of semantic word-finding substitutions displayed during baseline and control measures of confrontation naming. In light of these data, the possible source of word-finding breakdowns in these children is explored.

Acknowledgments
I wish to thank Cynthia Thompson for her input during several phases of this project and in particular for sharing her expertise on single-subject design. In addition, I am grateful to Sue Mulhern and Diane Hill for providing help in identification and clinical description of the two children who participated. Also, I appreciate the help of Sarah Valliath who conducted reliability measures and Danielle Williams who assisted with graphics. Finally, I thank Kevin and Bob and their parents for their participation in this project.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access