Sequential Recall in Individuals With Down Syndrome This study investigated whether memory for item order is selectively impaired in a group of individuals with Down syndrome. The ability to recall correctly ordered information was examined using two auditory tasks—narrative recall (Time 1) and digit span (Time 2)—and a nonverbal, visual task (Time 2) on which mental age ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1994
Sequential Recall in Individuals With Down Syndrome
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Elizabeth Kay-Raining Bird
    Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • Robin S. Chapman
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Contact author: Elizabeth Kay-Raining Bird, School of Human Communication Disorders, Dalhousie University, 5599 Fenwick Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 1R2 Canada. E-mail: rainbird@ac.dal.ca
Article Information
Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1994
Sequential Recall in Individuals With Down Syndrome
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1994, Vol. 37, 1369-1380. doi:10.1044/jshr.3706.1369
History: Received July 27, 1993 , Accepted May 10, 1994
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1994, Vol. 37, 1369-1380. doi:10.1044/jshr.3706.1369
History: Received July 27, 1993; Accepted May 10, 1994

This study investigated whether memory for item order is selectively impaired in a group of individuals with Down syndrome. The ability to recall correctly ordered information was examined using two auditory tasks—narrative recall (Time 1) and digit span (Time 2)—and a nonverbal, visual task (Time 2) on which mental age (MA) matching was partially determined. Although subjects with Down syndrome recalled significantly less information than MA-matched controls on both auditory tasks, replicating previous findings of auditory memory span deficits, no differences in the ordering of recalled information were found. Nor did the groups differ in the relative frequency of ordering errors in the visual task. Neither a pervasive deficit in sequential processing nor a specific difficulty in recalling the order of information is supported. Altemative accounts are discussed.

Acknowledgments
Preparation of this article was supported in part by NIH Grant R01 HD23353 to Robin Chapman and by Core Support Grant No. 5 P30 HD03352 to the Waisman Center on Mental Retardation and Human Development. The help of the participants is gratefully acknowledged. Sincere appreciation is extended to Scott E. Schwartz, University of Wisconsin-Madison, for all his help, and to Wade Blanchard, statistical consultant, Dalhousie University.
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