A 28-Year Follow-Up of Adults With a History of Moderate Phonological Disorder Educational and Occupational Results Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1994
A 28-Year Follow-Up of Adults With a History of Moderate Phonological Disorder
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Susan Felsenfeld
    Department of Communication, University of Pittsburgh
  • Patricia A. Broen
    Department of Communication Disorders, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Matt McGue
    Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Contact author: Susan Felsenfeld, Department of Communication, Division of Communication Science and Disorders, 3347 Forbes Avenue, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260. Email-Felsen@vms.cis.pitt.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1994
A 28-Year Follow-Up of Adults With a History of Moderate Phonological Disorder
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1994, Vol. 37, 1341-1353. doi:10.1044/jshr.3706.1341
History: Received August 23, 1993 , Accepted May 9, 1994
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1994, Vol. 37, 1341-1353. doi:10.1044/jshr.3706.1341
History: Received August 23, 1993; Accepted May 9, 1994

The present investigation is a follow-up to a longitudinal study involving approximately 400 normally developing children begun in 1960. From this large database, two groups of subjects (now aged 32–34) were asked to participate in the present project: (a) a group of 24 adults with a documented history of a moderate phonological/language disorder that persisted through at least the end of first grade (probands), and (b) a group of 28 adults from the same birth cohort and schools who were known to have had at least average articulation skills over the same period (controls). As part of a larger project, these adults were interviewed about their educational and occupational accomplishments and those of their siblings. Results revealed that, in comparison to control subjects, the proband adults reported that they had received lower grades in high school, required more remedial academic services throughout their school careers, and completed fewer years of formal education. Occupationally, although the groups did not differ in employment status, the proband subjects tended to occupy jobs considered semiskilled or unskilled with a much greater frequency than both the control subjects and their gender-matched siblings. When asked to indicate general satisfaction with educational and occupational outcomes, however, subjects in both groups tended to rate themselves as either “very” or “fairly” satisfied.

Acknowledgments
Portions of this work were presented at the annual meeting of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association in St. Louis, MO, November 1989, and at the annual meeting of the Behavior Genetics Association, Charlottesville, VA, June 1989. This research was supported by NINCDS Grant NS-25633 and a Grant-in-aid from the Graduate School at the University of Minnesota. The authors wish to acknowledge the invaluable assistance of Annetta Larsen, Jo Prouty, and Mildred Templin and would also like to thank Nancy Records, Judith Stone, and an anonymous reviewer for their helpful editorial suggestions.
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