Generalized Effects of Enhanced Milieu Teaching The primary and generalized effects of Enhanced Milieu Teaching were examined with six preschool children with significant language delays. In a multiple baseline design across children, trainers implemented the naturalistic language intervention during play-based interaction sessions in the children's preschool classrooms. Children systematically increased their use of targeted language skills ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1994
Generalized Effects of Enhanced Milieu Teaching
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ann P. Kaiser
    Department of Special Education, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
  • Peggy P. Hester
    Department of Special Education, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
  • Contact author: Ann P. Kaiser, PhD, Department of Special Education, Vanderbilt University, Box 328, Peabody, Nashville, TN 37203. E-mail: kaisera@ctrvax.vanderbilt.edu
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1994
Generalized Effects of Enhanced Milieu Teaching
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1994, Vol. 37, 1320-1340. doi:10.1044/jshr.3706.1320
History: Received October 6, 1993 , Accepted May 6, 1994
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1994, Vol. 37, 1320-1340. doi:10.1044/jshr.3706.1320
History: Received October 6, 1993; Accepted May 6, 1994

The primary and generalized effects of Enhanced Milieu Teaching were examined with six preschool children with significant language delays. In a multiple baseline design across children, trainers implemented the naturalistic language intervention during play-based interaction sessions in the children's preschool classrooms. Children systematically increased their use of targeted language skills during the intervention sessions, and these changes were maintained when the treatment was discontinued. Generalized changes in children's communication resulting from the intervention were examined with untrained teachers, peers, and parents. Some generalization to untrained partners was observed for all children. Correlational analyses indicated that greater numbers of child utterances and greater diversity in vocabulary were associated with increased talking and mands for verbalization presented by partners.

Acknowledgments
Conduct of this study was supported by a grant from the Office of Special Education (H023C10031). We are grateful for the cooperation and support of the Nashville Metropolitan Schools. We thank the children, teachers, and parents who participated in this study. Amy Harris-Solomon, Melissa Olive, and Anne Keetz served as trainers in the study, and we acknowledge their skilled contributions to this research. Mary Louise Hemmeter provided the initial training for the trainers. Paul Yoder provided statistical consultation on the generalization analysis. Members of the Milieu Teaching Group at Vander-bilt University provided technical support for data collection, data analysis, graphing, and manuscript preparation. We gratefully acknowledge these important contributions to our work.
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