Perceptual Rankings of Speech Quality Produced With One-Way Tracheostomy Speaking Valves Perceptual speech quality rankings, mechanical functioning, and maintenance of respiration as measured by oxygen saturation were determined for four different one-way tracheostomy speaking valves. Results indicated significant differences in speech quality rankings, with the Montgomery and Passy-Muir valves ranked significantly better than the Kistner and Olympic valves, and the Olympic ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1994
Perceptual Rankings of Speech Quality Produced With One-Way Tracheostomy Speaking Valves
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Steven B. Leder
    Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT
  • Contact author: Steven B. Leder, PhD, Department of Surgery, Yale University School of Medicine, Section of Otolaryngology, P.O. Box 208041, New Haven, CT 06520-8041.
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1994
Perceptual Rankings of Speech Quality Produced With One-Way Tracheostomy Speaking Valves
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1994, Vol. 37, 1308-1312. doi:10.1044/jshr.3706.1308
History: Received May 2, 1994 , Accepted July 1, 1994
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1994, Vol. 37, 1308-1312. doi:10.1044/jshr.3706.1308
History: Received May 2, 1994; Accepted July 1, 1994

Perceptual speech quality rankings, mechanical functioning, and maintenance of respiration as measured by oxygen saturation were determined for four different one-way tracheostomy speaking valves. Results indicated significant differences in speech quality rankings, with the Montgomery and Passy-Muir valves ranked significantly better than the Kistner and Olympic valves, and the Olympic valve ranked significantly better than the Kistner valve. The Passy-Muir valve was identified with the best speech quality most often by both listeners and subjects, and exhibited the fewest clinically relevant mechanical problems. Maintenance of respiration was not affected by use of any of the valves studied.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported in part, by the McFadden, Harmon, and Mirikitani Endowments. I would like to thank the valve manufacturers for providing test valves, and to state that I have no financial interest in and have received no financial support from the manufacturers. The author extends thanks to Emanuel Lerner for expert statistical advice.
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